Maximum Rocknroll #379 • Dec 2014

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Maximum Rocknroll #379, the December 2014 issue, features an interview with Brazil’s powerful RAKTA, who just took North America by storm and are about to embark on a full European tour; and a conversation with Craig, bassist of Philly’s unsung ’80s hardcore legends AUTISTIC BEHAVIOR, whose long-lost LP Shattered Cattle was recently released by SRA Records. World-renowned pastry chef Brooks Headley — drummer of BORN AGAINST, (YOUNG) PIONEERS, WRANGLER BRUTES, C.R.A.S.H., UNIVERSAL ORDER OF ARMAGEDDON and more — talks about his new cookbook and cooking on the road in the ’90s. Newcomers PROTESTER and MISLED YOUTH take a break from their summer tour to visit the MRR compound, listen to SSD records, and reflect on the value of all-ages shows. Israel’s MARMARA STREISAND talk politics and punk; anarcho-punk legends POISON GIRLS discuss the recent reissues of their classic LPs, and the Bay Area’s DICK & JANE talk about their decades-long partnership. Rhode Island’s Mothers News waxes on the esoteric and exoteric in print media, long-running Brooklyn DIY space Death By Audio gives a swan-song interview before closing later this month, Bay Area by way of Eastern Europe crust label Doomed To Extinction clue us in on their recent releases, and powerviolence grinders NUNHEX offer a peek at life as a punk in Miami, Florida. All of this, plus cover art by Cassidy McGinley, a pullout photo spread from Mateus Mondini, and as always, columns, zine, book and demo reviews, and the most extensive punk record review section in print!

Buy MRR #378

You can also order this issue by mail by sending $4.99 in the US, $7 Canada, $9 Mexico, or $11 worldwide to: MRR • PO Box 460760 • San Francisco, CA 94146 • USA …or just SUBSCRIBE!

Get a deal on a killer 2″ MRR button designed by Guillem or an MRR button 4-pack when you buy this issue in our webstore!


Still available: MRR #378 • November 2014 issue…

MRR #378Ex-Yugoslavian punk retrospective Part I: Slovenia, featuring BULDOGI, TOŽIBABE, INDUST-BAG, QUOD MASSACRE, PANKRTI, 92 (aka GRUPA 92), ŠUND, and KUZLE. Also, Indiana’s BIG ZIT and OOZE, the Bay Area’s YI, Jason Flower of the Supreme Echo label, photos from Philly’s Rockers! show, and an in-depth Australian scene report.

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You can now download MRR #378 for only $3.99!!
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Wanna be MRR’s new Distro Coordinator?


October 21st, 2014 by

Maximum Rocknroll magazine is seeking a Distribution Coordinator. This is an unpaid, full-time volunteer position. The Distro Coordinator lives at MRR HQ rent-free along with the two MRR Content Coordinators, and is in charge of our magazine distribution, subscriptions, mail orders and merch, among other things. To be MRR’s Distribution Coordinator you must be able to work legally in the US, have a valid driver’s license, be able to lift boxes, and keep a part-time (paying) job in addition to your MRR responsibilities. If you are interested in applying, please read on!

Record reviewing!

Fun times at MRR HQ!

The MRR Distribution Coordinator is in charge of all aspects of magazine distribution, including dealing with existing domestic and international distributors, seeking out new distributors, and figuring out how to get the magazine out there in this era of the supposed “death of print media.” This involves working with large, traditional magazine distributors, as well as DIY punk distros all over the world. The Distro Coordinator handles all aspects of mailorder, including individual magazine orders, subscriptions, and merch, like T-shirts and MRR record releases. The Distro Coordinator is responsible for ensuring that the magazine gets out to the punks each month, and taking care of all the details, including driving the magazines for international distributors to the airport each month, keeping organized accounts, corresponding with distros and individual punks who’ve ordered the mag via email and phone, as well as organizing shitworker labor. This job involves heavy lifting and accounting! We are looking for a creative, organized and focused mind that can handle a heavy workload, deal with all kinds of people, prioritize tasks, work until morning if needed, keep their cool in a crisis and make people feel welcome and involved — in short, a punk who can make things happen.

As Distribution Coordinator you will be part of a team of three coordinators and close to a hundred local shitworkers! Coordinators work a maximum of three days a week at a “regular” job in addition to running MRR. You get to live rent-free in the MRR compound in San Francisco (which includes laundry, internet, utilities, and access to our insanely huge record library), but you will need to earn money to pay for your burritos, records, shows, etc.

The Distro Coordinator’s daily tasks include:

  • Phone and e-mail communication with an international base of distributors and individual customers
  • Processing orders and managing a shitworker mailorder team
  • Keeping inventory of magazines and merchandise
  • Managing subscriptions
  • Monitoring postal costs, print runs, and supply orders
  • Invoicing, debt collecting, distro-related vendors and accounts payable
  • Prioritizing and delegating various tasks, recruiting new shitworkers
  • Making flyers, creating ads and doing layouts
  • Being BFFs with the USPS
  • Promoting of the magazine
  • Social media related to merchandise, subscriptions, and distribution
  • Sticking to very strict deadlines and quickly responding to queries
  • Working on a tight budget while still keepin’ it cheap for the punx!
  • Maintaining the MRR compound and replenishing distro- and compound-related supplies
  • Making deliveries to local sellers
  • Arranging distro tables at MRR shows, zine fests, record swaps, etc.

If this sounds like the life for you, please download this Coordinator Questionnaire, answer all of the questions, and email it (either as a .doc file or in the body of an email, including all of the questions with your answers) to mrr {at} maximumrocknroll(.)com. Please answer honestly and thoroughly. People who only give one-sentence answers will almost certainly be rejected. We want to know that you understand what MRR is about, are on board with it, and are serious about taking on a job with a lot of responsibility.

Download MRR Distro Coordinator Questionnaire



MRR Presents: Friday Funnies Nowhere City Bonus!


October 30th, 2014 by

We’re ramping up for our extra-special Halloween Friday Funnies, so we gotta catch up on Nowhere City‘s spooky saga “The Curse of the Were-Ooogle” in time for tomorrow’s big finale. Awoooooooooo!

NOWHERE CITY by Vickie Smalls!

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Every Friday we have a selection of comic strips from punx like you… You make funnies? Send em to funnies {at} maximumrocknroll(.)com and maybe you’ll see yer comic here next Friday!



New Blood! SCHLEIM , CHAINSHOT, MORON and ANONYMOUSE


October 30th, 2014 by

MRR magazine’s “New Blood” section is now a regular feature here on maximumrocknroll.com! See below for info on how to submit. Now, get to discovering some killer new shit…

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Band name:
SCHLEIM

Date & location formed:
We formed winter of 2013 in the basement of Thrillhouse Records in San Francisco.

Reason for forming:
Cause punk’s not dead and we wanna kill it.

What are your lyrics about?
Stabbing cops, petting cats, hating ATMs, crimes.

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How would you describe your sound?
Post-performance art pop-punk.

What’s in the future for this band?
I think were probably gonna go get a pizza from Safeway, or something.

Links and contact info:
www.facebook.com/pages/Schleim/1515746371972111

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chainshot

Band name:
CHAINSHOT

Date & location formed:
Nashville, TN, in May 2014.

Reason for forming:
To bring hardcore punk to Music City.

What are your lyrics about?
Love, suicide, murder, shootings, paranoia, joking about things that aren’t fucking funny, work, daily life, bad moons.

How would you describe your sound?
Fast hardcore from the Midwest circa early ’80s.

What’s in the future for this band?
We hope to have our second 7” soon.

Links and contact info:
Our first 7″ is at primitiveprison.bandcamp.com/album/chainshot-7
primitiveprison {at} gmail(.)com

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Band name:
MORON

Date & location formed:
January 2014, Western Mass.

Reason for forming:
Our other bands were winding down and Marc had songs written for many years with no band to play them. Moron is basically a vehicle for us to party and scratch that itch.

What are your lyrics about?
They’re poetic and abstract takes on traditional rock and roll themes and “the human condition.”

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How would you describe your sound?
’80s New York Hardcore meets classic heavy metal. For fans of Motörhead, Bl’ast, Stooges, Germs, ACDC, Danzig, Poison Idea, Black Sabbath, Gauze, Amebix, Youth Of Today, Antidote.

What’s in the future for this band?
Touring the US over the next year, a single on Community Chest, and currently finishing up an LP.

Links and contact info:
tamperedreels.bandcamp.com/album/moron-demo
marpaucan {at} gmail(.)com

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anonymouse

Band name:
ANONYMOUSE

Date & location formed:
2014 in Portland, OR.

Reason for forming:
We got together to make your ears bleed.

What are your lyrics about?
Anarchy and our life and stuff.

How would you describe your sound?
We sound like a bunch of angry monkeys on amphetamines.

What’s in the future for this band?
We exist to not sell out and hopefully not die in the process.

Links and contact info:
anonymouseband.bandcamp.com
anonyourbusiness {at} gmail(.)com

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Do you have or know of an awesome new band? It’s easy to submit to be in MRR’s New Blood feature. Just send us the following info, and keep keeping’ it real…

1) Band name:
2) Date & location formed:
3) Reason for forming:
4) What are your lyrics about?
5) How would you describe your sound?
6) What’s in the future for this band?

Along with the answers, please send a band photo at least 600px on the longest side (with photo credits), a logo if you have one, and links and contact info for the band to: mrrnewblood {at} gmail(.)com



Create to Destroy! RVA’s Vinyl Conflict


October 29th, 2014 by

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I met Bobby Egger in NYC back when thrash was a big thing on the East Coast especially in NYC, New Brunswick, DC, and Richmond —think 2008/MySpace era. He was living in DC and doing Headcount Records and was friends with NYC thrashers (you know, like “punk is dead/bang your head” maniacs like VERMEFÜG). Bobby wound up moving from DC to Richmond. I’ve kept an eye on him over the years and heard about him taking over the Vinyl Conflict record shop. Brandon and Lauren (the original owners) were great and had a vision, but life happens and their store got passed into Bobby’s good hands. So, have you ever had dreams of opening your own record store or running one? Well, hopefully you’ll get the juicy answers you longed for about being a shop boss, Vinyl Conflict, and a mini-update on Richmond, VA punk!

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Why’d you move from DC?
I initially moved down to Richmond to work for the Independent Label Collective. It was a distributor of vinyl and CDs for punk, metal and indie labels.

Why stay in Richmond, Virginia?
Work was a good start. Affordable living, affordable night life, and it was still quite central as far as being on the East Coast.

You guys still get a lot of bands touring through. Usually Richmond is as far south as anyone will go! How’d you wind up taking over Vinyl Conflict?
I took over the shop in February 2012. I was already an employee of the store at the time, and the previous owners had made the decision to move when they found out they we’re having twins!

Congrats Brandon and Lauren….so what was it like taking over a preexisting store?
It was very much like inheriting the shop — I tried to change as little as possible to keep the same ideals, location, and focus. The previous owners had a very special shop and people loved it for its unique flavor. I was very careful to make sure the shop never lost that charm.

You definitely inherited a gem! How did you change Vinyl Conflict from when you got it until now?
I haven’t made any drastic changes. I have tried to build out more of what we carry within the hardcore/punk/metal realm. Those genres mean a lot of different things to different people. I want to make sure as many people’s interpretations of that are met as possible. I’ve grown the stock a good bit, I am always looking for a stronger social media presence, and I promote as many gigs as I possibly can without losing my mind.

I have made some physical changes to the shop, as far as the layout, with different racks and placement. I had the front windows painted professionally by Sure Hands Signage.

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How do you figure out who to hire?
I’ve been very lucky to have reliable and knowledgeable staff. I’ve had a mix of friends and regular customers, as well as a couple references. However, I will say I’m generally in the shop every single day for some portion of the day (unless I’m out of town).

Do you sell online? Why?
I was against selling online because I did not want our in-store experience to compete with online shoppers. The other difficulty for me was if there is a title that I know I can sell, say, five copies in the store, I don’t know how many I would sell online. I was worried if I got five and sold them online I would disappoint my customers. I also wasn’t prepared to order numbers to keep online stocked.

I do sell online now a bit, because there have been those titles where I ordered five copies, but ended up selling no copies in the store, so I had to figure out a way to move those items. I have a very small Vinyl Conflict web store which has our in-shop titles, shirts, slipmats and some of the stronger titles we ordered in confidence to sell online, however I do not order every title with that in mind. We use Discogs a lot to sell off duplicate and obscure items which may not sell in a physical store.

Is it hard to stay out of the red?
I would love to say no, however it can be difficult during certain points of the year. Richmond is unfortunately extremely college based, even if most people don’t want to admit it. A large portion of the scene is service based, so when the kids go home, hours are cut and tips are in a lower quantity. We have the privilege of getting great shows all year long, so I have a fair amount of traveling shoppers as well as the touring bands coming through. But you really have to prepare for it. Everything’s going to sell eventually, but doing a huge order right before school gets out can really put a bind on things. Over-buying on titles that will be limited in quantity in times like this can hurt too, something that would sell 20 copies during a semester might sell four copies over summer break, but be out of print by the time school is back in session. Finding the balance is not always easy.

Is Richmond, VA, changing a lot?
Yes, I would say it is. The college is rapidly becoming a regular university, while it was originally known mainly for being an art school. Now it’s better known for its basketball team and its growing business school. It will always be a hub for culture, which will keep its music scene thriving. Rent keeps rising and people seem to be moving to more affordable neighborhoods,  opposed to leaving the city. More people interested in music seem to be moving here all the time, so I would just say the city is growing overall.

Why is Richmond a cool place for punks to live?
Cheap rent compared to many popular cities with big scenes, tons of shows, many different genre-based scenes with decent draws, affordable food, many vegan and vegetarian spots, and tons of art. It’s small enough to get anywhere on a bike or a five-minute car ride, and it’s surrounded by history and nature. It really has something for everyone, like a larger city, and still has the small town vibe (for better or worse).

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Any good new bands in Richmond?
I dont know how “new” your readers will be looking for — haha! So I’ll just cover as much ground as possible: ASYLUM, CRETINS, BARGE, FIRING SQUAD, PRISONER, SLUGZ, MERCY KILLINGS, OCCULTIST, UNSACRED, CHERRY PITS, CHRISITI and KEVIES HEAVIES will make my list today. Sorry, I’m bad at remembering stuff, I’m sure I’ve left someone out who will be disappointed. It wasn’t on purpose!

What are your favorite releases you are currently selling?
SLUDGE Conduct LP is some Japanese punk intensity. S.H.I. (STRUGGLING HARSH IMMORTALS) — both 7″s, also Japanese, kinda like MINISTRY meets DISCHARGE? New BAD DOCTORS LP for some sick new wave in the vein of DEVO, NEW ORDER and so on. New ASYLUM 7″ out on the shop label! BREAK OUT True Crime 7″. Any weird comps I can turn someone on to…

S.H.I. is the best band! Yeah, MINISTRY-meets-DISCHARGE is good description! So, for all us record nerds, what is the craziest, rarest record to ever come into your store?
ANTIDOTE Thou Shalt Not Kill 7″, URBAN WASTE 7″, POISON IDEA Pick Your King 7″, NEGATIVE APPROACH 7″, RODRIGO D No Fururo LP, AFI All Hallows EP 7″. I always think it’s never gonna get crazier, and then something always turns up. Yo, bring us your stuff — we ain’t afraid!

Are you a record collector?
Absolutely. I started collecting at age 14. I have my hardcore punk collection, a massive DEVO collection, DC go-go collection. I also collect reggae and surf rock. I can’t stop in a record shop with out looking through most of the stock.

What record is top on your trade/wish list?
I wanna fill out my Dischord and Dangerhouse collections. Looking for the RUDIMENTARY PENI 7″s, BIG BOYS Frat Cars 7″, THE FACTION 7″s, MIDDLE CLASS Out of Vogue 7″, CAUSE FOR ALARM 7″ and an assortment of other stuff.

Any last words?
The best way to check out bands isn’t to look for blogs that haven’t been shut down yet — it’s by grabbing a stack of 7″s and taking them to the listening station.

Or by seeing bands live. I still believe punk should exist offline! So, how can we best stay up to date on Vinyl Conflict?
We are all over the interwebs:
www.vinylconflict.com
Facebook: Vinyl Conflict Records
Instragram: Vinylconflict
Tumblr: vinylconflictrva

But the best way to stay up to date is to make a trip to the shop!



Slovenian Punk: A Brief Introduction


October 28th, 2014 by

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I have had a great deal of interest in how and why bands form under extreme political environments, and so when we decided to work on a series of special features focusing on bands active under socialism in the former Yugoslavian Republic, it was the perfect opportunity for me to dig deeper, do more research and look into what has already been written about Slovenian punk; and one article in particular was immensely helpful in understanding the historical events which lead up to the explosion of punk in Slovenia and the rest of Yugoslavia. I am not a historian, and surely history is better documented and passed on by those who made it happen, so that is what we  aimed to do, beginning with part one of our ex-Yugo series in MRR #378. The bands featured  have some incredible stories, which will surely make other punks around the world revisit their own ideas and ideals, but I figured a short introduction and some background information might help frame the greater political and social picture a bit better. Knowledge is power and we still have so much to learn.

Tožibabe

It was 1948. WWII was over. The leader of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the charismatic bon vivant Tito, had just split from Stalin and the Soviet Union, entering Yugoslavia into the newly formed Non-Aligned Movement. The country’s trade depended heavily on the Soviet Bloc, and with Western politicians “keeping Tito afloat” in hopes of appeasing Yugoslavia into neutrality and weakening the Soviet Bloc, the country plunged into an economic crisis. This was ideal ground for the introduction of a capitalist economy. What followed were two decades of “liberalization” in the ’50s and ’60s (less party involvement in the economic sphere) and a decrease in personal spending due to post-war displeasure, which was in turn met by heavy promotion of consumerism by the party. This lead to an increase in spending, as Slovenian families shrunk to an average of 3.5 members per household. People were buying TVs, record players, washing machines and scooters, many traveling to Trieste, a neighboring Italian city popular for shopping.

An unplanned side effect of this gradual shift towards consumerism meant that, surprise surprise, people pushed aside collectivist social notions for more individualistic consumption-driven ones. As Gregor Tomc says in his enlightening chapter, “A Tale of Two Subcultures, A Comparative Analysis of Hippie and Punk Subcultures in Slovenia” from the book Remembering Utopia: The Culture of Everyday Life in Socialist Yugoslavia, “Nobody seemed to notice how the emphasis of socialism shifted from creating an alternative to capitalism to entering into a competition with it.” This liberal economic change also brought about a rise in unemployment, which the party dealt with by opening the borders (the known Gastarbeiter), meaning lots of young people could travel abroad and be exposed to Western culture and youth styles. The results of this increased familiarity with the West is what helped the radicalization of the youth movement, and the growth of the hippie and punk movements.

During the ’50s the Yugoslav republic viewed jazz with suspicion, and it was even debated amongst top communist officials, saying that its “unhealthy outgrowths […] have nothing in common either with music or with dance” even though “it can—with its modern expressive means—positively influence the mood of the working man, his cheerfulness.” The only two recording studios were state-run and hard to get into without a record deal, which was contingent on a band’s lyrics, which were subject to the “Committee of Trash,” which basically regulated lyrics and made sure they did not oppose the party. This made access to self-expressed ideas and independent cultural media more difficult. For example, Pankrti recorded their first double single in Italy and any band that did release records made in state-owned studios had to “adjust” their lyrics, giving the art of reading between the lines a new meaning in the context of anti-authoritarian lyrics.

92 (aka Grupa 92)

92 (aka Grupa 92)

Something to remember, though, is that youth culture in Yugoslavia was developing in a socialist society gradually experiencing the assimilation of capitalism, while still being under the watchful eye of the Party gatekeepers, who were also having to learn how to react to, confine and/or control these new, “decadent” “imported” ideas from the West. This disapproval only made it all the more appealing, of course.

It is hard to imagine a life split in two the way it was for Yugoslavians: on the one hand a public life appropriate for state controlled activities (class-integrated neighborhoods, party-controlled school system, state-run cultural industry) and on the other a private, “spontaneous” life not structured by or around the official state norm (playing in rock bands, joining a commune, or being active in political youth groups). The hippie subculture was an important part of youth culture in 1970s Slovenia, as was the subpolitical student movement, which in some cases resulted in students being more radicalized that the party elite, as expressed in a popular student slogan of the time, “Communism against ‘communism.’” Western student movements were influential in this radicalization, leading Ljubljana University students to protest against dorm rent increases, the Vietnam War, Nixon’s Yugoslav visit, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, lack of Slovenian minority rights in Italy, and more.

Hard-Core Ljubljana Compilation

The student youth party was instrumental in the growth and dissemination of youth culture, and so when in the mid-’70s the state forced it to merge with the Alliance of Socialist Youth of Slovenia (ASYS), it left a sort of void which neither the hippie culture (which bored suburban youth) nor the socialist realism movement (the dominant one until then, a mix of traditional working class culture, Soviet block art and Western “progressive” ideas) seemed capable of filling. This was the ideal time for the party to strengthen its influence and, of course, for something new to flourish in the wake of its reaction. Over the next couple of years the punk movement grew tremendously, with more bands surfacing in Ljubljana and all around Slovenia—bands like Pankrti (Bastards), Lublanska Psi (Ljubljana Dogs), Grupa 92 (Group 92), Berlinski Zid (Berlin Wall), KuZle (Bitches), UBR (Uporniki Bez Razloga [Rebels Without a Cause]), III Kategorija (Third Category)—and this just in Slovenia, not to mention the rest of the Yugoslav federation.

One of the things about punk, not only in Slovenia but anywhere where punk has flourished, is that its characteristics are not that of a subculture stemming from the mainstream. Instead, punk springs as a reaction, a counterculture. Of course this meant that, even if the societal background in Slovenia was not necessarily adverse to youth cultures (as Slovenia was one of the most developed states in the Yugoslav federation) the system, which was losing control over media during the ’70s and ’80s thanks to new media technologies, viewed them with suspicion, even confusion. So, once the party finally declared its disapproval of punk, this opened the way for increased suppression from the state police. A number of incidents occurred, but perhaps the most well-known was the “Nazi punk affair,” when a populist newspaper wrongfully assumed three Ljubljana punks, who were sporting “Nazi Punks Fuck Off” pins with swastikas crossed out, to be members of the Nazi party. This resulted in their arrest under the charges of secretly trying to start their own IV Reich(!). It was clear that punk was no longer considered to be just a symbolic threat.

Indust-Bag

The student movement, despite having merged with the Alliance of Socialist Youth of Slovenia (ASYS), was still a major contributing factor to the evolution of punk. The elderly party elite figured it no longer played a leading role in the political landscape and dialogue, since it was now under party regulation. However, they underestimated the student movement power and, with the help of people like P. Mlakar (a poet, philosopher, artist, book editor and more), Igor Vidmar (a radio DJ, concert promoter, political activist and more) and other members of the student movement, they supported punk by playing punk bands on the radio, promoting their shows, publishing their comics and recording their records. If Marcuse’s “repressive tolerance” is where capitalism and totalitarianism meet, then Slovene punks were having to balance the thin line between the two, stemming from the former and growing into the later. Such a system clash is ideal for the eruption of youth movements, especially one as vivid and forceful as punk. Much like when two tectonic plates collide and mountains are formed, Slovenian punk rose, growing past the police interrogations, the arrests, the censorship, even Tito’s death. It would not be wrong to say that the punk movement in Yugoslavia helped society further open up to the concept of revolution, and this is perhaps where its strongest appeal lies: in the manifestation that, yes, punk can be more than just music, concerts and records; that, in fact, punk was and can still be a powerful force of social change. In his introduction to the Pekinska Patka interview for MRR in 2010, Spencer Rangitsch says that they “didn’t just ‘push the envelope’ of what was deemed socially and politically acceptable, they also broke boundaries in radical ways which helped create new spaces and possibilities for a youth subculture to thrive.” And that sounds pretty fucking punk to me.

Quod Massacre

These is much to be said about this unique time and place, and my short introduction is by no means a comprehensive deposition of all the facts—one could fill books and books and still have more to say. This was, however, the most relevant information I found, in large thanks to the aforementioned paper by Gregor Tomc. There is probably less written about punk in Yugoslavia during the Yugoslav wars that followed Tito’s death, but that is not to say that it did not exist. The idea behind this Ex-Yugo Special is to learn more about how and why punk erupted in Yugoslavia under socialism, and to shed more light onto how punk survives during and after wartime. Hopefully in the process we can broaden our horizon of punk history, helping us better frame our own perceptions of it. One of the most important characteristics of punk, for me, is the realization that, since we chose to create, and thus define the culture we engage in and the life we lead, then it is also up to us to preserve and document it. I am honoured to be able to offer these pages to some of the unsung progressives of the first wave of punk, and in doing so express my admiration for their contributions to it. Ladies and germs, Slovenia.

I have put together a shortlist of some of my favourite Slovenian punk songs. Not a comprehensive list by any stretch, as there are many bands missing, but here you go anyway. In no particular order:

Read the rest of this entry »



Monday Photo Blog: Ringside with Darryl Reid


October 27th, 2014 by

I’m always stoked when Darryl Reid sends something over to the Monday Photo Blog, because it’s always primo material, as you can see below. Darryl’s not afraid to get down on the dirty floors to get the shot, such as with Born Wrong, and Hashed Out. If you can’t get enough — and who can these days? — go check his tumblr page.

Rotten UK at Bleak Life Fest (photo by Darryl Reid)

Born Wrong at Bleak Life Fest (photo by Darryl Reid)

Aspects of War at Bleak Life Fest (photo by Darryl Reid)

Hashed Out at Ottawa Explosion Fest (photo by Darryl Reid)

Lost Youth at The Legion of Doom, Ottawa (photo by Darryl Reid)

Send your tour photos, bands that have come through your town, the best of your local bands, etc. to: photoblog {at} maximumrocknroll(.)com. Include your name, a link to your website (or flickr, Facebook, or whatever), and the band (or subject), date and location of each photo. Just send your best photos — edit tightly. Three to seven photos is plenty, and it’s best to send pictures of different bands. Please do not send watermarked photos. Please make your photos 72 dpi and about 600–800 pixels at the longest side. Not everything sent in will be posted, and a response is not guaranteed, but we do appreciate all of your contributions. Feel free to submit more than once. Thanks!