Maximum Rocknroll #378 • Nov 2014

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Maximum Rocknroll #378, the November 2014 issue, features Part I of our ex-Yugoslavian history series: an extended Slovenian punk retrospectiveBULDOGI, TOŽIBABE, INDUST-BAG, QUOD MASSACRE, PANKRTI, GRUPA 92, ŠUND, and KUZLE are interviewed about their roles in the fertile early Slovenian punk scene, including stories about smuggled instruments, bootlegged records, and high-school dances, as well as the legacy of Ex-Yugo bands. Also in this issue, Northwest Indiana’s BIG ZIT and OOZE stop by the compound on their West Coast tour for a split interview, and we have the final interview with recently-split Bay Area band YI. Jason Flower, the man behind the excellent reissue label Supreme Echo, gives us a window into how he developed his eclectic taste and clues us in to a few upcoming releases. An in-depth Australian scene report of punk activities Down Under and a photo spread from Philly’s recent POC Rockers! show round out the issue. And, as always, we’ve got all the columnists you love to hate, plus demo, book, movie and zine reviews and the most extensive punk record review section in print!

Buy issue #378 of MRR here

You can also order this issue by mail by sending $4.99 in the US, $7 Canada, $9 Mexico, or $11 worldwide to: MRR • PO Box 460760 • San Francisco, CA 94146 • USA …or just SUBSCRIBE!

Get a deal on a killer 2″ MRR button designed by Guillem or an MRR button 4-pack when you buy this issue in our new webstore!


Still available: MRR #377 • October 2014 issue…

MRR #377This issue of MRR features Venezuela’s chaotic FRACASO, Mia d’Bruzzi of the Bay Area’s FRIGHTWIG, Poland’s GOVERNMENT FLU, South Korea’s MYMANMIKE, Pittsburgh’s Mind Cure Records, ERA OF FEAR from Greece, England’s MEN OH PAUSE, Bay Area motörpunks ELEGY, HARSH WORDS from Athens, GA, photo spreads from L.A.’s Beserktown Festival and New York’s Latino Punk Fest, and Yecatl Peña with this month’s cover art and a Mexico City scene report.

Buy issue #377 here



Create to Destroy! Earhammer Studios


October 1st, 2014 by

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Greg Wilkinson is an integral part of the Bay Area scene, which is fragmented and has its own scenes but is definitely connected. He looks like a wizard and he is easy to spot — you’ll know who he is when you see him. At his Earhammer Studios, Greg records bands from all the facets of the local scene. I thought I’d interview him for Create to Destroy as he recently recorded a band for my label here in Oakland. Here is the Evil Wizard of Rock…

What bands have you been in?
Current bands: BRAINOIL and DEATHGRAVE; and former bands: LAUDANUM, LANA DAGALES, I WILL KILL YOU FUCKER, PHT, CHRONICLES OF LEMUR MUTATION, JOHN THE BAKER AND THE MALNOURISHED NOTHINGS, GRAVES AT SEA (for a short stint), and many others…

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Who has recorded your bands, past and present?
Dan Rathbun, Noah Landis, Kurt Schlegel, Mykee Burnt Ramen, and myself (most recordings I’ve been involved with engineering).

How did you start recording bands?
To make a long story not too unbearably long, in my early teens I had a Magnavox stereo with an instrument jack. I would dub a bass line or something with a mic onto a tape. Then put that cassette into the play side of the tape deck and record that and another layer onto another tape on the recording side. Then switch tapes and add more. Obviously, this sounded pretty much like a wall of crap, but it was enough to pique my interest.

Then, I think it was in ’92, I wound up with a Yamaha 4-track cassette recorder I borrowed from a friend of the family. Soon after, I was hooked and convinced my band at the time (a short-lived band called HOLLOW that did nothing) to purchase a Tascam 4-track. A year later I ended up buying a Tascam 8-track, which I would use to record not only my own bands demos but some friends bands as well (mainly recording in my parents house, friends houses, garages, or whatever we could find).

The machine was used and abused aimlessly recording demos, mainly of bands I was in. This lasted a good grip of years until ’98. At the time, I was in LANA DAGALES, which was a two-piece project. We decided to go to school for recording. We were living in Jackson Street Studios, a defunct rehearsal space in downtown Oakland, at the time and therefore jammed a lot. By this point I was becoming really disenchanted with the limitations of the machine. Accessing better gear would really help LANA DAGALES stay DIY while achieving documentation to our liking. During this time, we tracked demos on the Tascam for EXIT WOUND who was comprised of Jason of STORMCROW and LID TOKER, Rubin of CRUEVO, Jake of BLOWN TO BITS and NEUROTOXICITY and Melony. INSIDIOUS at the time was Jensen of IRON LUNG, Sal of ASUNDER, Jason, Seth of SKAVEN and DESTROY JUDAS and Melony.

In the school, we tracked our second demo, which became our first 7″. In ’99, as an alumni, I was granted access to the school’s facilities and recorded the FLESHIES and BRAINBLOODVOLUME (pre-LAUDANUM). Shortly afterwards the school disappeared, which is a fascinating story in itself. I then began tracking at Burnt Ramen on Mykee’s 1″ Tascam while building up a setup of my own in a painfully slow fashion. Eventually, by the time Earhammer started, there was a decent amount of bands I had the honor of working with.

What was the first band you recorded and where? What equipment was used?
My own band, called GENISORE, I believe was the first actual band I recorded that played shows and made tapes. The aforementioned 4-track and cobbled-together mics of the cheap-to-free variety.

How important is mastering for vinyl?
Extremely!!! Can’t emphasize this enough!

I feel the same. It drives me nuts when things don’t get mastered properly — it sounds like garbage! What advice would you give to someone wanting to start recording their own bands or bands in general?
The awesome news is getting a decent recording setup requires less space and sounds way better than it did in the early ’90s (or even the early ’00s) in the base level market. As the old adage goes, “Just get out there and do it!”  Never forget that learning is mostly discovered through failure. Your first recording will most likely be like your first guitar riff. Somewhere between horrible and passabl,e but in no way a waste of time and effort. It’s a building block. Don’t be disappointed if it isn’t a masterpiece. If the recording comes out bad, you will have at least learned something to apply to make a better run the next round. Too many young engineers believe too strongly in post-production, which is dangerous. Crap in will usually turn into crap out. So if it doesn’t sound right before pushing record, there won’t be too much you can do to improve the sound. The best result you can hope for is, “Well, at least it’s not as crappy as before!”

What’s the best way to sound proof a room and get the acoustics right? Does this matter?
It does matter a lot, but there are books about this subject as it is a very complicated issue to tackle. Budget (tuning a room can run thousands and thousands of dollars), available square footage, proper tools, and knowledge are all factors that can get really expensive, especially when done properly. On the slightly affordable side, YouTube has tons of lessons on building diffusers that work pretty well, for DIY communities to help control reflections in your room. Soundproofing requires mass of different materials and space (like building a wall inside a wall is a common example and more high end places even get into suspending rooms). Read the rest of this entry »



Record of the Week: GRAND COLLAPSE Far From the Callous Crowd LP


September 30th, 2014 by

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From the stock of legendary Bristol anarchopunk, a style that is emulated over and over, comes this new LP from GRAND COLLAPSE which is the most uncontrived, unexpected bright D-beat thrash that the punk rock timeline has to offer. There are even blackened melodies underneath proficient PROPAGHANDI-style riffage, creating an excellent genre mash-up for what is basically an anarcho-punk album. The strangulated vocals are spat out like a rabid Templeton at the veritable smorgasbord. The vocal pitch reminds me of Bay Area contemporaries ELEGY, actually. The production is perfect. The musicianship of GRAND COLLAPSE is so skilled that they cannot be pegged down to any one clichéd style. The heavy D-beat under flailed-out endless chords, into bellowing NYHC beatdown styles, will make you want to retrace those steps like a book you just skimmed over and felt like you missed a lot of what was going on. Then you will relax and enjoy something new. This album really has everything. Melody, angst and attitude, and does not let up for a moment. Heart, soul, guts and brains. I predict every band is going to want GRAND COLLAPSE on their tour. Far From the Callous Crowd is destined to be a classic. I’m very proud to have done the interview layout for GRAND COLLAPSE and now to be able to review the proficiency and vehemence behind their convictions. This is how you pole-vault the sound system.
(1859 / Anarchotic / A World We Never Made / Pumpkin / Riot Ska)

— Jason Ryan



Monday Photo Blog: Pete Craven and four the hard way!


September 29th, 2014 by

Pete Craven makes a return to the Monday Photo Blog, and as always, delivers some primo pixels of p-rock photography. This time around we get bands from Spain, US of fuckin’ A, and the UK. All from the comfort of your work cubicle, or handheld device, or whatever the hell you use to look at this site.

Don’t forget to check out Pete’s fanzine blog deal at zonkedfanzine.blogspot.com.

Maquina Muerta at the Cowley Club, Brighton, September 2014 (photo by Pete Craven)

Voight-Kampff at Ungdomshuset, Copenhagen, June 2014 (photo by Pete Craven)

Night Birds at The Black Heart, London, August 2014 (photo by Pete Craven)

Arms Race at The Grosvenor, London, July 2014 (photo by Pete Craven)

Send your tour photos, bands that have come through your town, the best of your local bands, etc. to: photoblog {at} maximumrocknroll(.)com. Include your name, a link to your website (or flickr, Facebook, or whatever), and the band (or subject), date and location of each photo. Just send your best photos — edit tightly. Three to seven photos is plenty, and it’s best to send pictures of different bands. Please do not send watermarked photos. Please make your photos 72 dpi and about 600–800 pixels at the longest side. Not everything sent in will be posted, and a response is not guaranteed, but we do appreciate all of your contributions. Feel free to submit more than once. Thanks!



MRR Radio #1420 • 9/28/14


September 28th, 2014 by

Tiff, Natalie, and Ciera visit San Francisco to celebrate new coord Grace’s 25th birthday.

Play

Intro song:
CHIN CHIN – Jungle of Fear

Happy Birthday, Grace.

Happy Birthday, Grace.

Kiss for the Wretched
KLEENEX – Eisiger Wind
BED BOYS – Costretti a Subire
NUBS – Job
PLASMATICS – Corruption
THE CONTROLLERS – Jezebel

Philly Babies, You’ve Got It Made
ELECTRIC DEADS – Kitchen Poet
KAOS 64 – Palco Maldito
MG 15 – Destruye y Huye
IMPACT – Solo Odio
SLAUGHTER AND THE DOGS – Boston Babies
VIOLATORS – Live Fast Die Young

Different Lives in Different Places
DOG FACED HERMANS – The Hook and the Wire
GANG OF FOUR – Love Like Anthrax
THE SLITS – So Tough
SIOUXSIE AND THE BANSHEES – Switch
THE BIRTHDAY PARTY – Cry

Tiff and Natalie Bring Your New(er) Punk
STASI – On Standby for Guilt
TRANCE – Extraños Juegos
BLANK SPELL – Vulgar Flowers
RAKTA – Life Comes From Death
MUERTE – Tortura

Twenty-Five, Still Alive
UNION – Rescue
SPRAYS – Kampfe dem Zwang
CHAOS – Get Out of My Pocket
THE STALIN – 豚に真珠
ZEX – WANDERLUST

Outro song:
THE BRISTLES – 1984 Reality Today

Maximum Rocknroll Radio is a weekly radio show and podcast featuring DIY punk, garage rock, hardcore, and more from around the world. Our rotating cast of DJs picks the best of the best from MRR magazine’s astounding, ever-growing vinyl archive. You can find MRR Radio archives, specials, and more at radio.maximumrocknroll.com. Thanks for listening!