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Record(s) of the Week: Violence Creeps

Record(s) of the Week: Violence Creeps

VIOLENCE CREEPS – “I’m Broke/Gridlock” flexi          “I’m Broke” is one of those songs that is ...

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Create to Destroy! Red Light Legal

Irochka Pechalochka organized a benefit for Red Light Legal that is occurring this weekend in ...

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Maximum Rocknroll #388 • Sep 2015

Maximum Rocknroll #388 • Sep 2015

MRR #388, the September Issue, features interviews with New Orleans mold breaking freak-punks MYSTIC INANE, ...

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Blast From the Past: Luk Haas and Tam 89 Records

This ran in MRR #307/Dec ’08. OUT OF PRINT A few months back Luk Haas ...

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Gattopardo (photo by Mateus Mondini)

MRR Radio #1463 • 7/26/15

Special guest Ben Paulsen joins Matt and plays some great stuff from his label Commodity ...

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Maximum Rocknroll #388 • Sep 2015

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MRR #388, the September Issue, features interviews with New Orleans mold breaking freak-punks MYSTIC INANE, vitriolic Texas snot-punk cult VIDEO, and Memphis’s Goner “groove masters” EX-CULT. We’ve also got conversations with PURE DISGUST (at the forefront of the NWODCHC), Terry Hammer (Toxic Reasons’ manager and a first wave San Francisco punker), Canada’s HIRED GOONS (oi! oi!) and Greece’s GUTTER. Plus, an in-depth tour diary from PERMANENT RUIN‘s recent European run and a back-n-forth with 1859 Records. Plus all the reviews and columns that you love!

Buy this issue of MRR

You can also order this issue by mail by sending $4.99 in the US, $7 Canada, $9 Mexico, or $11 worldwide to: MRR • PO Box 460760 • San Francisco, CA 94146 • USA …or just SUBSCRIBE!


Still available: MRR #387 • August 2015 issue…

MRR #387

SHEER MAG from Philadelphia, São Paolo’s CADAVER EM TRANSE, Madrid’s JUANITA Y LOS FEOS, the singular mind behind BUCK BILOXI AND THE FUCKS/GIORGIO MURDERER, France’s reunited NO-TALENTS, Stockholm’s DATA CONTROL, San Francisco’s Filipino punk label Aklasan Records, reflections on growing older in punk from Bob Suren and the VICTIM PARTY, plus photos from Boston’s Smash It Dead fest.

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You can now download MRR #387 for only $3.99!!
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Record(s) of the Week: Violence Creeps


July 29th, 2015 by


VIOLENCE CREEPS – “I’m Broke/Gridlock” flexi
         “I’m Broke” is one of those songs that is so immediately catchy, punk and destroyed that I thought it was a cover song. The band lurches through two chords while their singer Amber screams her fucking head off about all the shit she can’t afford. The band ramps up their energy through the two paltry minutes of this ripper until it’s on the verge of falling apart. It has an instantly classic sound that feels pure and raw in all the best ways. Without a doubt, it’s easily one of top five favorite songs of the year. That’s a hard act to follow, but “Gridlock” is also a ripper about being stuck in traffic. VIOLENCE CREEPS is lurchy, slow, destructive, pissed-the-fuck-off and perfectly raw. The soundtrack to losing your goddamn mind. This flexi (the worst format, my only complaint) comes with issue #16 of Degenerate magazine. (Greg Harvester)
(Degenerate)

VIOLENCE CREEPS – “On My Turf” EP
I don’t know what to tell you. Yesterday I woke up, ate a shitty fucking West Coast bagel (masochism rears its ugly head), sat down at this computer and didn’t stand up except to piss and refill my coffee for thirteen or so hours. This music is the soundtrack to that. Today I went to my low-paying job and my boss bought me lunch at the organic taqueria that is probably owned by white people and there was some sort of Instagram photoshoot going on involving fish tacos and a hot pink longboard and this was the soundtrack to that. Tomorrow I have to get up at 5:00 a.m. and get on a plane to Minneapolis to see my family which will be nice but we will probably get in a fight over my new finger tattoo and someone will get too drunk at dinner and we’ll all feel terrible about it but it will also be kind of funny and this will be the soundtrack to that. Last night I had an unending stream of maddening interactions with a series of punishers and this was literally the soundtrack to that. It was the record release show for this fine platter in the basement of a completely mystifying club and if you live in the Bay Area and you weren’t in attendance, you’re a poseur and a loser and an idiot. Too strong? I don’t care. Fuck you. This is the best band in the Bay Area. They make me wanna flip over tables and punch people in the face, but they also make me laugh like a maniac and wanna hang out and make weird art with my friends. It’s funny, it’s intelligent, it’s infectious and instantly classic. Watch the music video for “On My Turf.” You’ll get it, if you’ve got eyes and ears and a semi-functioning brain. Watch it. Now. Do you get it? Who needs John Brannon when you have Amber? There’s acoustic guitar and sax freakout and bass skronk and slow FLIPPER-esque sludge but also good old fashioned ’core and hooks for days. (“Drop Out,” you’re moshing!) This is a band that is getting better with every release and this record finds them at the peak of their powers, powers that don’t look quite like anything else out there. For fans of the “catchy-but-weird” hardcore du jour:if you like it tougher, meaner, smarter, catchier, more depraved—you’re a punk, right? So the answer is yes, right?—get this. Wake up, sheeple. (Grace Ambrose)
(self-released)



Create to Destroy! Red Light Legal


July 29th, 2015 by

CreateToDestroyLogo

Irochka Pechalochka organized a benefit for Red Light Legal that is occurring this weekend in Oakland, California.  Red Light Legal is a clinic that is a resource for those who work in the sex industry.   I thought it was important to interview her regarding booking this benefit for two reasons.  First- it’s important that punks book benefits and that we use our shows to help our communities.  Second- I also wanted to raise awareness about sex workers within the punk community aka your community in order to bring compassion and acceptance.  Here is Irochka Pechalochka on the Red Light Legal benefit shows and sex work within the punk community:

What is Red Light Legal and what services do they provide?

Red Light Legal is a sex worker-led legal clinic based in Oakland, California. The organization was founded by executive director Kristina Dolgin and staff attorney Matt Kellegrew. They advocate to reduce stigma, violence and discrimination associated with the sex industry, particularly for those who face intersectional oppressions due to racism, homophobia, transphobia, xenophobia and classism. Red Light legal provides direct legal services, public policy advocacy, community education and litigation services to sex workers in all corners of the industry.

Why is it important that an organization like this provide sex workers with resources?  

Sex workers are a highly vulnerable population. They are stigmatized and often criminalized within the legal system. Because of this, many sex workers are less likely to access legal services when it would otherwise be to their benefit. Red Light Legal responds to this gap in services by providing low-no barrier legal support from the perspective of current and former sex workers to anyone working anywhere in the sex industry.

Sex workers are often the targets of discriminatory policing. Making things worse, the common myths about sex work cause actual, real life sex workers to be drastically misunderstood. This lack of understanding combined with repressive stigma creates counterproductive, harmful laws and policies. The Anti-prostitution pledge for example, denies government funding to anti-trafficking and harm reduction NGO’s if they provide services such as STD testing and condoms to prostitutes.

The term “human trafficking” is also used alarming flexibly to describe people in a spectrum of circumstances ranging from those engaged in consensual voluntary sex work to people who have been the victims of serious, terrifying crimes. This ambiguity has caused law enforcement to prioritize the “low hanging fruit” or the most visible sex workers, leaving those who have truly been victimized to either fend for themselves or risk arrest and incarceration by coming forward. The result is less safety for everyone.

NRS.201.300 is another example of over broad public policy. Under this law, the children, family and friends of sex workers can be prosecuted as “panderers” or pimps if the sex worker supports them financially in any way. This puts not only sex workers, but their families and support networks at risk.

If public policy is ever going to change to become less harmful to sex workers, then it is going to be a result of advocacy by sex workers themselves. Red Light Legal aims to provide a safe, respectful space for sex workers that supports their individual needs while also working to shift public policy.

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Blast From the Past: Luk Haas and Tam 89 Records


July 28th, 2015 by

This ran in MRR #307 MRR #307/Dec ’08. OUT OF PRINT

A few months back Luk Haas visited Maximum Rocknroll for the first time in his long history of writing for the magazine. We were lucky enough to sit him down for an interview.

Interview by Cissie Scurlock, Layla Gibbon and Justin Briggs.

Luk w-records

Luk at the Maximum Rocknroll compound

 MRR: How did you discover punk?

Luk: I think I first listened to punk in high school. I had a bunch of friends who were listening to different kinds of rock stuff that was coming out. Sometimes during our lunch break, we would play records. At some point, someone brought the Sex Pistols LP. That would have been back in 1979 or 1980. It did not impress me very much. At that time, I was listening to a lot of different bizarre kinds of rock music, including metal and prog rock and stuff like this. However, I went to some kind of live, open-air concert, I think it was in 1979. I hitchhiked to a place close to the border of Luxembourg, called Rettel. The Clash were playing that night. Still, I was not a punk at that time. When I went to the concert, the open field, there were a lot of punks. I think it was the first time in my life I ever saw punks. I was kind of scared, because they were wearing swastikas and spitting on each other and fighting. I was like, “uh-oh.” I was a kid, like sixteen. And I was on my own. So I was trying to stay away.

Later on, I went to Poland in 1983, when I was twenty. When I went there, I visited some Polish friends, who introduced me to Polish rock music. It was the explosion of Polish rock music in the early ’80s. There were a lot of different styles. It was going from punk to new wave to metal to alternative to any kind of rock music. So they introduced me to all the current Polish bands that were releasing records. Among them was one punk band called Brygada Kryzyz, which used to be called Kryzys. They had just released their famous black LP. My friends told me, “Listen to this, this is Polish punk.” I was like, “Hmm, very interesting sound.” It was not like rock ’n’ roll like the Sex Pistols. It was something else, something out of the ordinary. At some point, there was also some kind of mix between punk and reggae on the record, which I liked very much, because at that time I was already listening to some reggae stuff.

This was the first punk band in Poland. Then there was the coup by General Jaruzelski, and they banned the Solidarity movement. Then it became underground, and most people were arrested. It was then a state of emergency in Poland. When I was there it was still the state of emergency. Then, because this band had been organizing gigs to support the Solidarity movement, they were banned by the authorities. They could not play anymore, and the record was not available. The record was out, and the authorities probably destroyed whatever was left in the shops.

I was following what was going on in Poland, with the worker’s movement, the mobilization against the regime. I was very interested in all this kind of political stuff. I had already started to be involved with local minorities’ issues, where I’m from. I come from a region where there is a minority language, a German dialect and minority culture, so we are not like the real French guys you may meet in Paris. We have a dual culture—we speak German and we speak French. We are very small, it’s just a few thousand people in France, so we are a very small minority and we are not recognized by the State. So I had, very early when I was a teenager, this idealism and political attitude that we are a minority, we should be recognized by the State, etc. I was a conscientious objector at the same time, I refused to go to the military. At that time it was still compulsory, and I refused, so I had to do civil service. I was already very politically active.

So when I was in Poland, I was like, wow this is fantastic, these punks, they are doing good stuff, and they are banned. I was really into it. There was something going on in Eastern Europe, which was very different from what’s going on in the West. Rock in the West was music, it’s entertainment. In the East, it was political. They were moving forward, they were going to confront the regime. They were going to jail for their ideas. I said, “Wow, this is the stuff.” Poland opened my eyes.

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MRR Radio #1463 • 7/26/15


July 26th, 2015 by

Special guest Ben Paulsen joins Matt and plays some great stuff from his label Commodity Tapes, along with plenty of punk from all over, new and old.

Play

Intro song:
WILLFUL NEGLECT – EMS & Die

Gattopardo (photo by Mateus Mondini)

Gattopardo (photo by Mateus Mondini)

Fuck themes, just rip shit up!
SLIME – Schweineherbst
URGENT FURY – 58,000 Dead
DVA MINUTA MRZNJE – Moderna Omladina
TOOLS – Hard Wark
BLANK SPELL – Malign Eye

Commodity Tapes sampler set
SYNDICATE – Commune
XM2 – Farmaco
ERA OF FEAR – Era of Fear
ΠΑΝΔΗΜΙΑ – Δίχως Νόημα
PIG DNA – Dom

No common thread except AWESOME
GATTOPARDO – Retro
EXIT CONDITION – Days of Wild Skies
BORN DEAD ICONS – Forever Soaked in Blood
LAUGHIN’ NOSE – Get the Glory
MOSKWA – Za Kratami

Commodity Tapes: Pandemonium Series highlights
REBEL’D PUNK – H.E.R.O.I.
DEAD BEAT – I Won’t
3D – Paga Se Para
CANI – DDT
MCD – Gernika

Outro song:
DOWNTOWN BOYS – Poder Elegir

Maximum Rocknroll Radio is a weekly radio show and podcast featuring DIY punk, garage rock, hardcore, and more from around the world. Our rotating cast of DJs picks the best of the best from MRR magazine’s astounding, ever-growing vinyl archive. You can find MRR Radio archives, specials, and more at radio.maximumrocknroll.com. Thanks for listening!