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New Blood! ALLERGY, DESPERFECTO, and MODERN LOVE

MRR magazine's "New Blood" section is now a regular feature here on MRR.com! See below ...

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Video of the Week! Distorted: Reflections on Early Sydney Punk

This month's Maximum Rocknroll magazine features an interview with Des Devlin, the filmmaker behind the documentary Distorted: ...

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Record of the Week: CADAVER EM TRANSE LP

Based in São Paulo and featuring members of RAKTA and SPEED KILLS, this is a ...

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Guest Column: Sean Hocking on Genjing Records

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Absurdo at Txoritokieta, August 2014 (photo by Fidel Gutierrez)

Monday Photo Blog: Fidel Gutierrez

Here's some pretty cool photos for the Monday Photo Blog sent over the Atlantic by Fidel Gutierrez. These ...

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Maximum Rocknroll #377 • Oct 2014

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In Maximum Rocknroll #377, the October 2014 issue, we have an extended interview with chaotic hardcore band FRACASO, featuring reflections on life as a punk in Venezuela and the complications of playing in a band with members spread across the globe. Mia d’Bruzzi from early Bay Area punk band FRIGHTWIG tells us about life as a feminist in a developing punk scene and the band’s current projects. Yecatl Peña (from INSERVIBLES, TERCER MUNDO, and more) drew this month’s cover and shares a long-overdue Mexico City scene report, with a rundown on all the bands, venues, festivals, and record shops you need to know about in the new wave of Chilango punk. Poland’s GOVERNMENT FLU share reflections on their US tour, while Seoul, South Korea’s MYMANMIKE look forward to their upcoming journey through North America and tell us how three dudes from three continents ended up playing in a powerviolence band together. Prolific label Mind Cure Records gives us a window into their multi-layered history as documentors of Pittsburgh punk, and we’re introduced to the synthy sounds of Greece’s ERA OF FEAR and England’s MEN OH PAUSE. Bay Area motörpunks ELEGY clue us in on their upcoming plans, HARSH WORDS reassure us that there’s more to Athens, GA than REM, and we’ve got two photo spreads featuring shots from L.A.’s Beserktown Festival and New York’s Latino Punk Fest. And, of course, we’ve got all the columnists you love to hate, plus demo, book, movie and zine reviews, and, as always, the most extensive record reviews section in punk print.

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Maximum Rocknroll #376 • Sept 2014

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How’s it going, Maxi Rockers? We just got another killer edition of MRR hot off the presses! In Maximum Rocknroll #376, the September 2014 issue, we have an extensive talk with punkettes the DISHRAGS, one of the first all-lady punk bands, who started out in Canada in 1977; we spend some time superbly wasted with Chicago’s favorite punk ragers GAS RAG, and we talk to Toronto’s hardcore menaces and mobilizers S.H.I.T.. We also have a long talk with Jon and Jensen of Iron Lung Records, talk abyss punk and goth inspiration with Philly’s FAR-OUT FANGTOOTH, and Madrid’s EXTINCIÓN DE LOS INSECTOS debate experimentation and creativity within the DIY setting, while director Vladimir Kozlov tells us about his upcoming documentary on ’80s Siberian punk, Traces in the Snow. Last but not least, after a great split EP and before their upcoming tour in the US, we get a split interview with Finnish dark synthy post-punks KUUDES SILMÄ and MAAILMANLOPPU; a chat with Paul Birnbaum of SEPTIC DEATH, and a scene report from Patras, Greece! All this, plus “New Blood,” Shitworker of the Month, a photo spread, book, demo, zine and movie reviews, all the columns you love to hate, and let’s not forget the most extensive review section in punk print! Grab your copy today!

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Maximum Rocknroll #13 • April/May 1984


July 29th, 2014 by

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DOES PUNK SUCK??? Well, does it? We now travel back in time to 1984 to hear what Doc Dart, Tim Yo, Pushead, Allison Raine, and Frank Discussion have to say about punk’s future… Also included in this discussion from Maximum Rocknroll issue #13 — now available to download in its entirety here — are Glen E Friedman, Rev Nørb and many other punks from all your favorite bands and zines. It doesn’t stop there! This issue also features the WIPERS, COLERA, AMEBIX, NIHILISTICS, UGLY AMERICANS, SECOND WIND, and a devastatingly vast array of reviews and scene reports, ads for records that now cost a lot more than they did in 1984, and so much more! 

DOC DART/CRUCIFUCKS
I appreciate the opportunity to comment on a subject which is as perplexing as it is challenging. First of all, the labels which have been tossed (punk/hardcore) about in a feeble attempt to pigeon-hole bands and audiences alike, are a source of aggravations and alienation for me. There was a time when I didn’t mind and was sometimes proud of being called a “punk.” The music was new and exciting and the label at least set me apart from the mundane and often sickening mass of idiots that refer to themselves as Americans.

Now, more often than not, I’ve found myself confronted with an equally mundane and sickening mass of twerps, some of whom refer to themselves as “hardcore punks.” They are usually not in the majority at shows but their techniques of drawing attention the themselves borrow from some of America’s most inane traditions: football, fashion show, the Marines, and Quincy. It’s no wonder that people who might otherwise be interested in good music, or even starved for good music, often go away from “hardcore” shows wishing someone had warned them that the circus was in town.

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Doc Dart

For many people, music is a potential vehicle for social change. Obviously, it has thus far worked much better for the government than it has for positive change. My suggestion is that you mindless violent, fashion-conscious exhibitionist, whose prime motivation is to assert your “manhood,” please just frequent shows that showcase bands with your mentality (need I list some of them?), and allow the rest of us to transcend these ridiculous labels (such as hardcore), as well as your pitiful lifestyles. There would be much more support for a “scene” that valued intelligence, compassion, education, action, and most of all, creative music. I know of many people who would show much more interest (myself included) in something positive and ever-changing, as well as diverse, and free of labels that only serve to stifle and stereotype behavior. I’ve seen signs in a few cities that this is possible. Madison, Wisconsin, is a good example. As far as I’m concerned, “hardcore” is another word for stagnation. Can we call it music if it’s good? That would make it an even rarer phenomenon, but at least a growing one. It was the prohibition of good music that spawned our so-called movement; so why shouldn’t we claim ours as music, and dismiss the mainstream as “hardcore shit”? And anybody in your crowd that goes out of their way to act tough or to spend five hours perfecting their appearance could be encouraged to assume their rightful place among mainstream Americans with traditional values. Eliminate five ignorant twerps and maybe ten good friends will take their place. The ignorant will return when intelligence becomes “fashionable.” Don’t be misled in thinking that I have hope for the future, because I don’t, but how can anyone give up with so much at stake? Ever get the feeling you’re living in a cage and then wonder why everything outside is deteriorating faster than you?

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Tim Yo

TIM YOHANNAN/MRR
One of punk’s main thrusts was “anybody can do it.” But democracy often leads to mediocrity. If many hardcore bands now sound generic, should we be re-thinking our commitment to “democracy” and return to elitism in music, as some would like to see? Or should we say that democratizing music was just the first stage, and now that we’ve got  “a band in every garage,” let’s move on to stage two: quality and imagination.
This is the big hurdle: how to maintain the spontaneity and passion of garage music, while becoming more proficient musically, and while trying to break formulas of song structure and lyrical approaches. Hopefully, we’ll see more bands keeping the emotion, noise, and commitment of hardcore (the edge), while taking more chances in trying to surprise and excite us. Speaking of which, it seems to me that most of today’s bands are content to just entertain the audience. They play as if they were at rehearsal, song after song, with no room for spontaneity, just like the formula “rock” bands. Originality, and crowd interaction are the victims. In the earlier days of punk, the creative performance was stressed more, with the accent on both irritating and stimulating audience participation. Now, it seems that musical perfection is the goal, and bands want to merely satisfy the expectations of the audience, taking fewer chances, and turning punk into another consumer package, a “concert” to placate the masses.

The other major problem that I see is how punk/HC will be able to survive (at a grassroots level) the new corporate attempts to co-opt it. As “Rock of the ’80s” stations start playing SUICIDAL TENDENCIES, DKs, DOA, etc., and major labels start chasing punk bands, will those bands remember the sad tale of the CLASH? They elected to “go corporate” (in order to get their message to more people?), and now, seven years down the road, have the following to show for it: they 1) claim to be broke, financially; 2) are without a direction, proclaiming themselves “born again punks,” yet showing an abysmal lack of knowledge of what’s been happening in punk since they lost touch with their roots (indie clubs, indie promoters, indie labels, indie zines); and 3) are without a sense of integrity, having been thoroughly “used” by the very corporations they sing against, and make rich. Punk’s ability to maintain its integrity and maintain its commitment to the alternative scene will be the real determinant of its future.

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Pushead

PUSHEAD/JACK OF ALL TRADES
The worst aspect of the punk/hardcore attitude/lifestyle is alot of the people got involved to be an elite few, to claim it as something that was “their baby,” different than whatever everyone else did. By that factor, it gave them confidence and strength, and some took it too far. So when the interest grew and others got involved, it became apparent that some didn’t want the “new crew” to come in, for it was their “scene,” so they soon dropped out and criticized the “image” which they felt everyone was acting out. Sure, during that time they made rules and regulations about “their ” idea of what should happen and how it should be done, and laughed at others as they laughed at themselves, only to soon become what they were laughing at. I thought everyone was supposed to share a common belief for a certain progression. But when you let your disbelief in those who enter the “attitude” rival your own, and then get angered, whose revolution is it? When society can market the hardcore product, make money off the rising phase, and the disbelief between the people involved, all these factions lead to the end of another revolution. So how can it be such a threat when some of the people involved are so selfish? Myself, I’m sadly disappointed at my friends who had such positive attitudes, but got so upset by certain negativities in their scenes that they quit, instead of continuing their positive voice and fighting their negative, as they just didn’t care any more. Thanx for nothing. You let yourself down.

I’m sadly disappointed at my friends who had such positive attitudes, but got so upset by certain negativities in their scenes that they quit, instead of continuing their positive voice and fighting their negative, as they just didn’t care any more. Thanx for nothing. You let yourself down.

The strength grows. Through my associations, I have discovered a strong “positive” force who are willing to learn, create,and seek a better tomorrow. Some people have their faults, which can be dealt with, but some breed ignorance. Those people who whine say things “rule,” take advantage, or use violence to show their lack of confidence in themselves, should look at what they were doing. I find that most people who are guilty of this sit on their asses all day with their mouths flapping and their minds stagnating. Too bad. I hope you really accomplish something by your insecurities! The way you dress has nothing to do with whether you’re hardcore or not; it’s what you think and how you act. I’m not talking about socially accepted or “proper” mannerisms, either. It’s your lifestyle. Do you agree with the situations “they” get you into? Will you sit on your arse forever?? Think about it. It’s up to you. Come out from your silence.
 Lately, this magazine has opened up a giant communication line throughout the world. I’m very happy that I am part of it. I do not get paid and I don’t expect payment. It is my creative part that I can contribute. What about you? People slag this magazine and Tim Yohannan especially. Why? Do you know? Tim’s interest can unite more than the bitching of one. His participation abounds; only your negativity will tire him out. If MRR becomes big it’s because there is a desire for it. Next time you bitch I hope you have something behind you beside the chair you sit in. I’m not talking about your macho brute force either. I’m talking about your ability to create.Make your effort, show your hardware, come out from your silence, and then we can work together! Thanx to all who share the same attitude, to those who take the time to write and pass the word. It’s your world. Is it shitting on you or are you shitting on it? To save the world, must you destroy the people? Think about it.

ALLISON RAINE/@ STATE OF MIND, SAVAGE PINK ZINE
Being an ancient veteran of the scene at 21, I have followed and been a fan of punk/hardcore and its legions of splinter groups for nigh on six years now. When I was 16 or 17 and attending every show even remotely associated with punk with enthusiasm bordering on hysteria, I couldn’t understand how the scene vets of those days could skip a show or complain that “things just weren’t as cool as they used to be.” When I first took an interest in punk, it was because I couldn’t relate to the lame stuff I heard on the radio. I found the primal pogo beat of the RAMONES’ “Teenage Lobotomy” much more fun and stimulating. As time passed, I became (largely by influence of the music) more—er—”politically aware” and therefore more interested in music that made a statement about the world we live in. The merging of two things important to me, natch. Although my musical tastes are wide-reaching, this is what I had close to my heart. But the whole excitement that punk has held for me all these years is that the only difference between the audience and the band is that the band got up on stage. Or is it?

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A phrase being tossed around a lot these days is “generic thrash.” Those with the most years invested in the scene are the prime offenders, being jaded after years of listening hundreds of punk bands bang away at the same four chords. There’s nothing wrong with being bored with it, but there is something wrong with condemning it. Fuck if I’ll be the one to tell someone they’re not musically proficient enough to hold my interest. There’s nothing wrong with striving to be innovative or different, but neither is there anything wrong with having enough enthusiasm to jump up on stage and just do it! By putting down bands for being “generic,” we are only throwing the scene into reverse and heading back to the days of guitar heroes. This should not be allowed to happen, and all bands that are giving it a go should be encouraged and nurtured by us all.

Well…all bands?

This brings us to the next point—where the scene is headed socially and ideologically. Besides musically being fresher and more energetic, one of the things that has kept me involved these many years is that it has not fallen into any of the cliched, sexist, racist, or otherwise negative ruts that the wonderful stuff we hear on radio or see on MTV has—yet. For me, the most disappointing trend in punk currently is towards sexist, nationalistic, and otherwise backwards trends. Quite a few of the bands playing this stuff claim that it’s a joke or that it’s all in fun. Well, why aren’t they making fun of white, heterosexual healthy people like themselves (for the most part)? I don’t think that’s funny at all. But even that aside—the people I’m wondering about are the (let’s face it) more impressionable people who are 15 or 16 and just getting into the scene. What kind of values or opinions is this kind of humor going to to instill in them? My only hope is that there seems to be an equal, if not greater number of bands using their music to speak out against things like sexism, fascism, etc. While some will still moan about being “preached ” at, there seems to be more and more people listening to what these bands have to say and at least stopping to stopping to think about both sides of the story. A lot of people seem to be realizing that, gee, women and gays are people too, and that God & Country aren’t all they’ve been made out to be.

In conclusion, I remain optimistic that punk will remain true to its roots and resist the temptations that brought rock’n’roll to such a disastrous state in the late ’70s (and even still today); namely, money in all its different forms. While punk, when it began, was mostly a musical revolution, it seems that the youth of today are even more painfully aware of the problems of society and the world as a whole, and these observations are creeping into our music. This musical influence will hopefully spawn more aware adults who question things and refuse to apathetically except all that is fed them by church, state, and the like. Although I may not make it to all the shows these days, I’m still 100% behind those that do.

FRANK DISCUSSION/FEEDERZ:

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To download a complete PDF of MRR #13 and other back issues of MRR, go to the MRR Webstore!



Maximum Rocknroll #375 • Aug 2014

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Holy smokes, time flies when you’re having fun! Despite a rent raise and USPS wanting to dig through our holey pockets, we’ve still managed to bring you a new supreme edition of Maximum Rocknroll — MRR #375, August 2014! In this issue we talk with Iberian powerhouse UNA BÈSTIA INCONTROLABLE before destroying the US on their upcoming tour; in honor of their very exciting 20th anniversary, we get a special extended interview with Extreme Noise Records; plus an in-depth story on one of Leningrad’s punk progenitors, Andrei “Svin” Panov. In this issue we also feature HC’s newest darlings GLUE from the great country of Texas, too cool for your school Cool Death Records from Down Under give us the skinny on their new releases, and two floor-thumping air-punching stripped-down punk bands from Japan, EIEFITS and THEE MIGHTY FEVERS. Serbian rock ‘n’ rollers S.U.S. discuss breaking the norm in Serbia and bringing back the glam in punk, Barcelona’s VÈRTIGO tell us about their local scene, MISCALCULATIONS from the UK talk about their minimalist yet calculated approach to music, and a tour diary from Canada’s BORN WRONG takes us on a bender and lets us live vicariously through the band’s HC misdeeds. Plus two photo spreads, a special “New Blood” spread, your favorite columnists (plus guests!), book, zine, demo, movie and of course the most extensive record reviews section in punk rock print y’all—plus much, much more! Cover art this month by Jordan Poggerpants.

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Maximum Rocknroll #374 • July 2014

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What’s up Maxi Rockers?! Having fun in the sun? Well, while most of you were raging in the pit at the fests, or bombing the pool at Punk Bowling, we were hard at work on another killer issue of Maximum Rocknroll! This month, in MRR #374 — the July 2014 issue, we have interviews with Bay Area grungy punkettes the QUAALUDES and jazzy hardcore noise rockers NO BABIES, Slovenian punk savant Igor Vidmar on Ex-Yugo punk history, Australian mutant punk rockers AUSMUTEANTS, and Peru’s bellowing D-beat punks WAÑUY! Also featured in this issue, you’ll find Canadian melancholic Oi! lads BISHOPS GREEN, activist balaclava punks GULAG BEACH, Poland’s cold wavers 1984, and UK’s D-beat ragers ENDLESS GRINNING SKULLS. Also! Wales hardcore peace punks GRAND COLLAPSE, Brazil’s dark chaotic D-beat FEAR OF THE FUTURE, Seattle heavy melodic crust punks COUNTDOWN TO ARMAGEDDON, a beautiful Colombian scene report, two photo spreads  — from DC and TX — Shitworker of the Month, book, demo and movie reviews (phew!) and of course, let’s not forget, the most extensive reviews section in punk print! Find it all in this new exciting issue of Maximum Rocknroll!

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