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Create to Destroy! Loud Punk

I met Chris when I was with Perdition on a small Montreal/Albany tour in 2010.  ...

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Record of the Week: C.C.T.V

Record of the Week: C.C.T.V

C.C.T.V – “Quiet” EP The coolest record of the year so far at least to these ...

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2 METRIC TONS OF STEEL, 100 KILOMETERS AN HOUR: Permanent Ruin on Tour in Europe

San Jose's Permanent Ruin recently went on tour in Europe. Drummer Rich Gutierez wrote an ...

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Venganza!

New Blood! SONIC ORDER, VENGANZA! and EXHAUST

“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info ...

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Spokane, WA

MRR Radio #1467 • 8/23/15

Big ups to SK & Kip and 1990s Spokanarchy on this episode of the Rotten ...

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Record of the Week: C.C.T.V


August 25th, 2015 by

C.C.T.V – “Quiet” EP
The coolest record of the year so far at least to these ears, total nervous frantic post-punk created in the furtive fertile NW Indiana scenery…The songs are tightly wound fraught invocations of the indignities of modern life, anxiety and paranoia, everything sounds like it was recorded on a boombox at the wrong speed adding to the strange feeling of otherworldliness, like walking through a dead mall full of fake plants and broken ideas. It’s perfectly retro, really sounds like a recently excavated secret basement from the 1979 New Wave/punk collision, but it’s from now, and is fresh yet eternal. The sputtering drums and stumbling bass with that sick dollar store guitar sound, while the coolest vocalist lists her demands and concerns. It’s just so fuckin rad, like SU TISSUE fronting DEVO at their most hardcore…I think it sold out, but a repress is on the way. (Layla Gibbon)
(Lumpy)



Blast From the Past: Xcentric Noise


August 4th, 2015 by

this ran originally in MRR #339

by Andy “Shesk” Thompson

I’m listening to the Beating the Meat LP from 1984 to get me self in the mood, but it really pisses me off every time I hear it… It was a great compilation, a culmination of the stuff I’d done to date, all the excitement of receiving the tapes, the tape-to-tape duplicating, the stupid sound effects, the letters, the DIY!! When I went into a studio with the quarter-inch tape to put it together (Angel Studios near Hull, with Steve Larkman the engineer — I’m sure he thought I was nuts), I paid about £240. I designed the cover and wanted to do the usual inner sleeve — since packaging was always well important and far more interesting and exciting than a two-track single in a plain sleeve — but I had no money and accepted an offer to release it…and was ripped off, struggled to get any copies, the cover was just turned orange and had no inner sleeve, it never looked or felt right — and yet sounded amazing! There was no communication and it took ages for me to get back my costs for the studio, which only happened because I knew the guy at the distributor Jungle Records and he felt guilty, ’cos he knew I was on a loser. I managed to get a few copies off him, too, but not many. I dunno how many were actually made or sold.

And for the record, I made nothing from Beating the Meat and was forever pissed off that all those years had been hijacked!! Just one of my many regrets, but at least it got the bands heard again around the world! Please have it for free (download via mediafire.com) ’cos I’m not re-releasing it, not that I ever got the master tape back anyhow. I’ll be happy you just at least hear all the bands on it, ’cos that’s all Xcentric Noise was about — trying to pass on some of the excitement I was feeling, spreading this amazing music with message and passion and screaming anger and everyone doing it yerself! It was just so energising….

DISCOVERING PUNK

shesk_oldI first got into punk about May ’77, the moment I first heard it. I was only fourteen years old, previously had liked T. Rex and Sparks and some Bowie. I remember going into school the day after seeing a newspaper with the Sex Pistols in it, and talking music with my mate Mu. He said, “You’d love punk — listen to John Peel.” Bang, it was instant — a real slap in the face. My tranny radio and the pillow were my friends for a few years after that, and definitely the best part of the day! I guess maybe I’d finally found somewhere I felt I could belong, somewhere outside the norm.

I grew up in Little Weighton, England — a village with no streetlights, pretty cut off from the world. I guess I didn’t fit in with the norm, a kinda loner but with friends, the weird one, and the only one really into punk down our way. But ’cos I played football pretty good, I didn’t get fucked around, just the piss-takes like normal. They never got punk rock! I just ended up doing stuff all the time in me room while always liking and supporting the underdog (Hull City / Norman Wisdom [RIP] / Newport County); I was anti-injustice, anti-apartheid and anti-poverty, and I hated pop music, disco and shit soft rock crap.

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Blast From the Past: Kleenex


July 9th, 2015 by

This interview originally ran in MRR #324/May 2010, now sold out
There’s no sense in hiding the fact that Kleenex/LiLiPut (K/L) are my favorite girl punk band. There’s hardly even a reason to qualify them with “girl” and “punk”, as they made more amazing, wild songs than most bands ever will. In just a few short years during the late 1970s-early ‘80s, they shredded apart the rules for how punk was supposed to sound, and how feminists were supposed to look. And it was danceable. At that, K/L always seemed so free to me, existing in some alternate universe where all girls had instruments and record collections, and were determined to start bands. Their music is long out of print, save for Kill Rock Stars’ double-disc anthology from 2001. As their popularity and influence still grip new generations, KRS has once again unleashed Swiss vibrations across the globe. March brings a new CD, live footage, plus a DVD of their tour document, Roadmovie, and clips from Swiss television performances. Additionally, the original anthology will be available on wax for the first time as a 4-LP box set later in May. I hope summer will bloom new bands as a result! Founding member and bassist, Marlene Marder answered some questions for MRR from her home in Zürich.
Intro & Interview by Jess Scott

MRR: A while back I bought that Kleenex diary from you. It’s incredible! A little gift straight from the bins… as if your responsible aunt was saving each magazine clipping along the wild ride. A couple of things strike me about it: There’s a great mix of handwritten zine-type stuff, but also a fair amount of traditional, mainstream, and critic stuff. Did those two forms of documentation seem like different worlds at the time?
Marlene: No, there was this zine-scene and compared to the commercial music magazines, which followed the new music, maybe made it was more serious?

MRR: Can you clarify a bit? Were the commercial magazines serious, or..? Which did you like being featured in more?
Marlene: Difficult to say. It was great to see the magazines in stores; it made it kind of official. The zines were great too, and it felt more familiar, fan-made.
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Blast From the Past: Thrillhouse Records


July 1st, 2015 by

This ran in MRR #297  which came out in February 2008, you can grab it here

At the very beginning, I’ll admit to having just the slightest amount of skepticism towards Thrillhouse Records’ survival prospects, especially when at their pre-opening day meeting it seemed like no one knew exactly how much to charge for sales tax. But time has proven the space to be an overwhelming success. The committed collection of punx involved with building and running Thrillhouse have managed to carve virtually from scratch a small but incredibly significant niche of thriving DIY punk culture into the landscape of San Francisco—no mean feat by any stardards. By the time this issue comes out, Thrillhouse Records will have celebrated their one-year anniversary. I sat down with nearly a dozen volunteers in November to talk with them about the store’s brief history.
Interview by Chris Hubbard

MRR: Let’s begin by talking about how the record store got started. Whose idea was it and how did you take it from an idea to a reality?
Fred: Starting a record store and show space was something I’d been talking about and wanting to do for quite a long time. For a long time we had Mission Records here, which was a really great place. I have really great memories from there. It closed down a few years ago, and all of a sudden the city didn’t have a punk rock record store or a good all-age show space. Both of these things are super important, and you really felt the hole that that Mission Records left. I assumed that some one would take it upon them selves to fill that hole and open up something similar, but years later still no one had. I daydreamed about dong it myself, but never really felt like it was very realistic. About a year and a half ago, I was going to school at the time, and I remember there was this one show I went to. It was a One Reason show and there was an intro to one song and they said something like: “What’s the point of going to school when you’re just going to do stuff like this? You’re just going to go to shows. What’s the point of spending thousand of dollars on school when you’re just going to do this? Learn from books or your friends.” I was like yeah! I’m spending thousands of dollars on school and this is stupid; I really just want to be doing stuff like this!

Garrett: One Reason started the record store!

Fred: Yeah, kind of. That’s when I really started talking about seriously doing it. I ended up dropping out of school the next semester with the intention putting my energy and time into opening up a Mission Records kind of place. I talked with a bunch of people about it and there was a crapload of people really into it, and a crapload of people that thought I was full of shit. But it really made a difference, the people that were really into it like Jesska, Zoe and Sarah T. We’d go on bike rides through niegborhoods we wanted to have the space in, just looking for “for rent” signs in the window. And that’s how we found this place.

Jessica: I remember talking to Fred about it. We had just met at the Kung Fu USA show. We met sharing the mic with Shell and afterwards we were like… “It was really nice rocking out with you. We should do that again sometime.” We hung out at a party a week later, and Fred was talking about wanting to start a record shop and I was talking about missing having a place to put on shows, and we talked about how cool it would be if we could put those two things together. Fred said, “I’m going to go ahead and drop out of school.” I was going to go on a trip with some friends a few months later and whenever I got back from that we were going to start looking for places. But Fred was looking while I was gone. And I’m from the Midwest and I love the basement situation and there aren’t any basements here. I got home and him and Sarah T. had been looking at places and we found this one and it was totally perfect. We moved in a few days later and started tearing up the floor and started building.


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Record of the Week: Flesh World


June 24th, 2015 by

a0857245988_16FLESH WORLD — “The Wild Animals in My Life” LP

I should probably disclose that FLESH WORLD might have already been my favorite San Francisco band before I heard this record. So I may be going into this review a little biased. But who among us wouldn’t be? Even you, reader, have probably been acquainted with them already, by last month’s interview in this magazine for instance, or maybe through their frequent appearances in monthly and yearly top-ten lists here. For the new record I would have been perfectly satisfied with eight tracks that sounded like their debut 12”, but they’ve taken steps to change things up here. For one, guitarist Scott Moore adds some synth textures to a few songs here, which within the scope of Don Pyle’s production is perfectly subtle. If you have a friend who decries the presence of any synthesizer as New Wave and False, don’t tell them; they may not even notice. If you’re less insecure in your punk predilections, you may appreciate the oscillation between the desperate drive of “To Lose Me” and the WAKE-like textures of the title track. Everything you love about FLESH WORLD is here; Diane Anastasio’s minimal but forceful drumming, Moore’s florid guitar leads, Jess Scott’s 12-string jangle and uncannily catchy melodies. We’re all significantly bummed out about this band’s potential hiatus, with their drummer moving away, but as the last track slowly shifts into some minimal electronic snaps and clicks we can at least retain some hope of Jess and Scott starting the only post-punk techno project that really matters, right? In their interview here they discussed what continues to make San Francisco a place worth living in, but their music itself makes a pretty strong case. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: get a 12-string guitar and leave everything else behind. (Eli Wald)

(Iron Lung)