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Material Support (photo by Jjca Photography)

New Blood! BURP!, MATERIAL SUPPORT, THE VITAMENS, THE DRIPPIES, MIRROR, 86 GEMINI, WÄRFEAR, RARE FORM, and NOPES

“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info ...

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WYX

MRR Radio #1519 • 8/21/16

This week Matt is joined by ex-MRR coordinator, veteran, and overall badass Golnar Nikpour! Intro ...

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MRR Radio #1518 • 8/14/16

JJ Doll stopped by during their west coast tour to drink our coffee and raid ...

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Minority Threat (photo by Levi Marshall)

New Blood! MINORITY THREAT, SATÉLITE, ROHT, OUTSKIRTS, CÃOS, CASUAL BURN, and BLOTCHOUTS

“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info ...

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Maximum Rocknroll #400 • Sept 2016

Here it is: the September 2016 issue, Maximum Rocknroll #400. It’s hard to believe we’ve ...

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New Blood! WET BRAIN, SNEAKS, and CAMP KOALA


October 1st, 2015 by

“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info on how to submit. Now, check out some killer new shit…

Band name:

Date & location formed:
We had our first practice on New Years Eve at the end of 2012 in Baltimore City.

Reason for forming:
We formed out of necessity. I think all of us needed this creative outlet in our lives- the opportunity to be as loud, lewd, and aggressive as we want to be, but in a controlled and specific way.

What are your lyrics about?
Our lyrical content is diverse and very personal. We write about the social pressures to conform to gender roles, the oppression of capitalism and working in the service industry, walking home alone at night in Baltimore, bad relationships, the thought process involved in getting an abortion, and so much more. We are unapologetically expressing our thoughts and feelings about the turmoil and experiences that many women in our demographic also share. Hopefully this narrative can provide an outlet for people who don’t have the opportunity to be so out front and aggressive.

wetbrainkeg

How would you describe your sound?
We play heavy surf punk. The low end is extensive because we have two bass players.

What’s in the future for this band?
I don’t know what the future holds. We are very motivated and driven to keep writing and releasing material. We have toured extensively in the eastern USA, so we’d like to branch out and go farther West. After our 12″, “Not Sorry” comes out we will being working on booking a European tour which has been a long term goal for us.

Links and contact info:

wetwetbrain.bandcamp.com
www.facebook.com/WETBRAINWETBRAIN

barbed-wire-500x12

Band name:
SNEAKS

Date & location formed:
Early 2014 in my dorm room in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Reason for forming:
Only thing that made sense at the time.

Sneaks (photo by Walter Wlodarczyk)

Sneaks (photo by Walter Wlodarczyk)

What are your lyrics about?
Family feuds.

How would you describe your sound?
Cult rock.

What’s in the future for this band?
Releasing new songs on new tape new new soon.

Links and contact info:

sneaks.bandcamp.com
sneaks2000.tumblr.com

barbed-wire-500x12

Band name:
CAMP KOALA

Date & location formed:
2014 November, Budapest.

Reason for forming:
We wanted to spread some emo terror with a little spoon of twee in it.

What are your lyrics about?
Most of them are political: against patriarchy or basically the system, about how stupid they think we are. But sometimes its just about atmosphere.

How would you describe your sound?
90s dissonance, present noise melodies. Though my favourite description is by MRR columnist Viktor Vargyai: Pinhead Gunpowder memorial / early Cat Power and late Die Kreuzen copyband.

What’s in the future for this band?
The future is yet to be written – Ulrike Meinhof

Links and contact info:

www.campkoala.bandcamp.com
Listen to them on Youtube

Camp Koala (photo by Tamás Bernáth)

Camp Koala (photo by Tamás Bernáth)

barbed-wire-500x12

Do you have or know of an awesome new band*? It’s easy to submit to be in MRR’s New Blood feature — just email us the following info, and keep keeping’ it real…

1) Band name:
2) Date & location formed:
3) Reason for forming:
4) What are your lyrics about?
5) How would you describe your sound?
6) What’s in the future for this band?
7) Links and contact info:

Along with the answers please send a band photo at least 600px on the longest side (with photo credits), and a logo if you have one, to:

*By “new band” we mean a band that formed within the past year or year and a half.



Blast From the Past: Luk Haas and Tam 89 Records


July 28th, 2015 by

This ran in MRR #307 MRR #307/Dec ’08. OUT OF PRINT

A few months back Luk Haas visited Maximum Rocknroll for the first time in his long history of writing for the magazine. We were lucky enough to sit him down for an interview.

Interview by Cissie Scurlock, Layla Gibbon and Justin Briggs.

Luk w-records

Luk at the Maximum Rocknroll compound

 MRR: How did you discover punk?

Luk: I think I first listened to punk in high school. I had a bunch of friends who were listening to different kinds of rock stuff that was coming out. Sometimes during our lunch break, we would play records. At some point, someone brought the Sex Pistols LP. That would have been back in 1979 or 1980. It did not impress me very much. At that time, I was listening to a lot of different bizarre kinds of rock music, including metal and prog rock and stuff like this. However, I went to some kind of live, open-air concert, I think it was in 1979. I hitchhiked to a place close to the border of Luxembourg, called Rettel. The Clash were playing that night. Still, I was not a punk at that time. When I went to the concert, the open field, there were a lot of punks. I think it was the first time in my life I ever saw punks. I was kind of scared, because they were wearing swastikas and spitting on each other and fighting. I was like, “uh-oh.” I was a kid, like sixteen. And I was on my own. So I was trying to stay away.

Later on, I went to Poland in 1983, when I was twenty. When I went there, I visited some Polish friends, who introduced me to Polish rock music. It was the explosion of Polish rock music in the early ’80s. There were a lot of different styles. It was going from punk to new wave to metal to alternative to any kind of rock music. So they introduced me to all the current Polish bands that were releasing records. Among them was one punk band called Brygada Kryzyz, which used to be called Kryzys. They had just released their famous black LP. My friends told me, “Listen to this, this is Polish punk.” I was like, “Hmm, very interesting sound.” It was not like rock ’n’ roll like the Sex Pistols. It was something else, something out of the ordinary. At some point, there was also some kind of mix between punk and reggae on the record, which I liked very much, because at that time I was already listening to some reggae stuff.

This was the first punk band in Poland. Then there was the coup by General Jaruzelski, and they banned the Solidarity movement. Then it became underground, and most people were arrested. It was then a state of emergency in Poland. When I was there it was still the state of emergency. Then, because this band had been organizing gigs to support the Solidarity movement, they were banned by the authorities. They could not play anymore, and the record was not available. The record was out, and the authorities probably destroyed whatever was left in the shops.

I was following what was going on in Poland, with the worker’s movement, the mobilization against the regime. I was very interested in all this kind of political stuff. I had already started to be involved with local minorities’ issues, where I’m from. I come from a region where there is a minority language, a German dialect and minority culture, so we are not like the real French guys you may meet in Paris. We have a dual culture—we speak German and we speak French. We are very small, it’s just a few thousand people in France, so we are a very small minority and we are not recognized by the State. So I had, very early when I was a teenager, this idealism and political attitude that we are a minority, we should be recognized by the State, etc. I was a conscientious objector at the same time, I refused to go to the military. At that time it was still compulsory, and I refused, so I had to do civil service. I was already very politically active.

So when I was in Poland, I was like, wow this is fantastic, these punks, they are doing good stuff, and they are banned. I was really into it. There was something going on in Eastern Europe, which was very different from what’s going on in the West. Rock in the West was music, it’s entertainment. In the East, it was political. They were moving forward, they were going to confront the regime. They were going to jail for their ideas. I said, “Wow, this is the stuff.” Poland opened my eyes.

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Record of the Week: Gas Chamber


July 8th, 2015 by

GAS CHAMBER – “Stained Hands” EP
Though I must confess that I’ve personally slept on them for far too long, these progressive Buffalo punkers have been turning a lot of heads recently (pun intended) with their left-field take on hardcore, and this record makes it all too easy to see why. The titular track starts out as a meandering, sunbaked slice of anarcho-psych, taking its sweet time before cascading into a cacophonous whirl that is at once ripping and dreamy. The B-side is just a fierce, with desert vibes that would make the MEAT PUPPETS proud, and they even manage to pull off an instrumental track on a hardcore 7”! Getting more mileage out of a chorus pedal than just about any band in contemporary punk (R.I.P. LIFEFORM), I could see this getting filed under the ever-so-saturated banner of “melodic crust,” but this is simply too fuckin’ weird to squeeze into any generic microniche. Cheers to GAS CHAMBER and SPHC for another solid fuck off to hardcore conformity. (Will Blomquist)
(SPHC)



Blast From the Past: Screaming Females


June 23rd, 2015 by

This originally ran in MRR #312, in May 2009, which you can pick up here

Screaming Females is unique in that they have figured out a way to bring incredible guitar work into punk without seeming gratuitous, cheesy, or forced. This is no easy feat. Guitar player, Marissa Paternoster’s spastic guitar bursts (often understated on record in comparison to their live show) manage to maintain remarkable cohesiveness with the music and come across as an extension of the vocals and not merely as a show of talent. Equally remarkable is that the rhythm section, made up of Jarrett Dougherty on drums and King Mike on bass, is not only able to keep up with the powerful guitar work but often able to best it. It’s rare to find three such uniquely talented musicians in any band, let alone in a punk band. In 2006/2007, the band self-released two full-lengths and a 7”. These were followed by two split 7”s in 2008. This year will see the long anticipated third full-length, Power Move, which will be released in April on hometown label, Don Giovanni.

10_sf_frump

MRR: How did you meet each other?

Marissa: Mike and I went to high school together, we met there. And I met Jarrett in college at a meeting for a club we were in.

 

MRR: What club were you in?

Marissa: Record label club! It was a really cool club.

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Monday Photo Blog: Graham Meldrum


May 11th, 2015 by

Graham Meldrum sent us some photos for the Monday Photo Blog. Here are a couple. These were taken at the 13th Note, which I believe I  was at back in the year of 2000, at the recommendation of MRR staffer and roving Canadian Allan MacNaughton. From what I remember the place is a resturant as well as music venue. Glad to see it is still around. If you go, be sure to get the vegan bangers and mash.

Harda Tider (Sweden) at the 13th Note, Glagow, Scotland (photo by Graham Meldrum)

Damaged Head (Sweden) at the 13th Note, Glagow, Scotland (photo by Graham Meldrum)

Send your tour photos, bands that have come through your town, the best of your local bands, etc. to: . Include your name, a link to your website (or flickr, Facebook, or whatever), and the band (or subject), date and location of each photo. Just send your best photos — edit tightly. Three to seven photos is plenty, and it’s best to send pictures of different bands. Please do not send watermarked photos. Please make your photos 72 dpi and about 600–800 pixels at the longest side. Not everything sent in will be posted, and a response is not guaranteed, but we do appreciate all of your contributions. Feel free to submit more than once. Thanks!