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Break-In (photo by Robert Charles Keller)


“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info on how to submit. Now, ...

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Create to Destroy! 4th Annual Richmond Punx Picnic

I dropped the ball and did not post this in time. That said, I hope y'all still made it out ...

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The Mummies! (pic by Mark Murmann)

MRR Radio #1528 • 10/23/16

Rob and Frog play some favorite fall jams including an all Ian MacKaye set. Earphones on and volume up! All ...

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“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info on how to submit. Now, ...

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Pretty sure the photo says it all

MRR Radio #1527 • 10/16/16

Is it moshable? Well, a little bit. Intro song: CHAIN OF STRENGTH - Just How Much? Langford and the New Gnu (not moshable) PRE ...

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Reissue of the Week: HEX Poison In The System: The Demos LP

November 13th, 2015 by

HEX – “Poison In The System: The Demos” CD
If you liked your punk, the UK in the early to mid ’80s was a good place to be. Not only were all kinds of genres flourishing within said rubric, but there was a significant community of like-minded souls, putting on gigs, writing (and distributing) fanzines, (cassette) tape labels, and whatnot. It meant that bands could (and did!) release demos, on cassette, and distribute them far and wide. The anarcho-punk “scene,” spawned by the likes of CRASS and their progeny (SUBHUMANS, CONFLICT, FLUX OF PINK INDIANS, MOB, et al.) were the inspiration and incubator for HEX. Hailing from the Northeast of England, they were part and parcel of the legendary (well, to us folks, anyways) Sunderland Bunker, a venue, and musicians collective. Herein you’ll find four demos tapes (fourteen tracks in all), recorded in 1986 and 1987. A variety of musical styles, evocative of KILLING JOKE, ANTISECT, and the FAMOUS IMPOSTERS grace the demos. It all features the music gifts of Dickie Hammond and Dave Lainey, better known for playing in HDQ and later LEATHERFACE. Really great stuff all round, and some excellent liner notes do a superb job of capturing the sense of community, and possibility that was nurtured by the scene. (Ramsey Kanaan)
(Boss Tuneage)


Record of the Week: G.L.O.S.S. Girls Living Outside Society’s Shit EP

November 13th, 2015 by

G.L.O.S.S. – “Girls Living Outside Society’s Shit” EP
This exists perfectly as a solid hardcore record, nothing necessarily freaky or weird just excellently solid but a thing that makes it stand out (other than the context it exists in) is that you can hear all of the lyrics. No reading along with lyric sheets necessary—somehow, at breakneck speed Sadie manages to enunciate every word. A thing that is always rough to me about hardcore is all the vocals garbled and barked until I kind of just feel like some angry man is yelling at me. And what Sadie is singing about is so integral and important it’s just really fucking cool to just hear every lyric. This record delves into politics in a way that avoids being exclusionary or preachy but instead is filled with rage and love and an overall we’re-in-this-togetherness. It also comes with an excellent zine that furthers the aesthetic and message.
(Nervous Nelly / Total Negativity)

—Marissa Magic

Record of the Week: Aye Nako The Blackest Eye EP

October 14th, 2015 by

AYE NAKO – “The Blackest Eye” 12”

Brooklyn’s AYE NAKO are back with their first release since their 2013 debut LP Unleash Yourself. I know that the band wanted to change their sound after that LP in an attempt to distance themselves from the “pop punk” label and even went as far as talking about releasing a hardcore EP. (I’d love to hear that since “Good Grief” from their demo is still one of my favorite songs of theirs). Instead of hardcore, they went in a completely different direction and delivered a lush, dense, guitar heavy, indie-shitstorm (that’s good) that recalls some of the melodic sensibilities of the best SUPERCHUNK stuff and the guitar noodle-ry (that’s a word) of TED LEO. I don’t use these band names to imply that they’re using these well-worn roadways as a blueprint. I use them as a signifier that AYE NAKO knows their history, they know what the fuck they’re doing and they build on those who have come before them to create their own new beast that is theirs to tame (or not tame) as they see fit. The whole presentation feels like a step up from the band’s previous record, which was no slouch but had moments that felt rushed or not quite fully-realized. There’s no wasted space here. The lyrics dig deep into thoughts on sexual abuse, race, the quagmire of eternal self-doubt, the fucking total-realness of never-ending white supremacy and the insidious ways that it continues to sustain itself. In a music scene that cannot stop focusing on white skin and cis-gender bodies, this record is unapologetically queer, defiant and brown. Plus, it has a lot of sweet hooks. All of these things are important. All of these things are good. I can’t wait to hear what they create next. (Greg Harvester)
(Don Giovanni)

Blast From the Past: John Morton

October 12th, 2015 by

SPECIAL JOHN MORTON EDITION! Below you will find an interview that James, the impresario behind Violet Times did for Maximum Rocknroll in 2011, if you want the authentic newsprint feelings you can grab the issue #337 right here.

Since this majestic interview took place a few exciting developments in eels/mortonia have developed that the psychotic minds that are drawn to such ideals might want in on… x___x have a new record coming out! ON the illustrious SMOG VEIL label… Someone unearthed a live JAZZ DESTROYERS set which you can listen to here, fans of Dave E vocal stylings rejoice! You can also send off for John Morton art via his amazing website. I drink coffee out of an electric eels mug daily and it has increased my satisfaction twenty-fold. You can get a post card set! You can also read a great interview that Alex Ratcharge, MRR columnist and arts issue editor, did with John Morton for Ugly Things here.


There’s been much written about the musical exploits of the early 70’s Cleveland, Ohio band known as electric eels (yes, lower case as per lead vocalist Dave E’s intention) over the years, some of it true even. The band deservedly looms very large in under-the-counterculture sound circles and I strongly encourage anyone reading this to seek out their music, read about their exploits in a pre-punk world if you haven’t already done so. The liner notes to the 3×10” vinyl offering on Scat Records “Those Were Different Times” are a great place to start, w/ plenty of other stuff out there to read as well. One could even be justified in calling them the very first ‘punk’ band, whatever that means- if nothing else they remain to this day one of the most intense sounding and unique. After all of these years, it very much still is artastic.

In honor of his inclusion in the Violet Times curated art show, Foggy Notion, I decided it would be a good time to find out about some of band leader John Morton’s other little-known doings over the years, specifically his visual art and other music he’s done post- eels.


MRR: I’ve been told that only about 100 people total ever saw electric eels, would you agree and care to elaborate on their reaction/s, if any? Especially at the two Columbus, Ohio shows, pre- Extermination Night, where the other performers Mirrors & Rocket From The Tombs would at least be of a non-mainstream music making mindset, also making their own music of a sort not yet known or accepted by the mass ear. What about the non-members of those bands, just ‘regular’ audience members- who the heck were they, why’d they show up and what’d they think? (not presuming you know why they were there, etc. but just saying)

John Morton… 100 sounds like a plausible number. Our fan base, consisted of persons made up of people (who like people) who knew us, such as Bradly Field, Charlotte Pressler, other like-minded band people, such as Dan Didonato and Peter Laughner, at least understood what we were attempting. Family members such as Jill Marotta & Michele Zalopany, well they had to like us.

Our first gig was August of 1974 at the Moonshine Co-op in Columbus. We had the power pulled on us (I’ve heard that that is not a unique occurrence with punk bands, but there were no other “punk” bands at the time.)

We opened for “Hard Sauce” fronted by Jamie “Little Bit of Soul” Lyons. Jamie had one of the best set of pipes I ever heard. Davey and I were arrested that night. I remember every detail. Dave E. wore a trench coat festooned with rattraps, and I wore a safety pin jacket. Jamie bailed Dave E. out of jail. Our career? All downhill after that.

We thought the eels were going to be a huge success on a par with David Blowie (meant affectionately). WE WERE NOT!

I am gratified that we’ve had a modicum of post mortem success.

Read the rest of this entry »

Reissue of the Week: MERCENÁRIAS Demo 1983 LP

October 8th, 2015 by

MERCENÁRIAS – “Demo 1983” EP
There is probably no band like MERCENÁRIAS. This 3/4 femme Brazilian band, better known for their late ’80s post-punk repertoire, made an extraordinary first recording that seems out of time and place. Totally weird, awesome, and fierce: peculiar gruff vocals that predate grindcore layered over angular choppy rhythms making it sound like someone took a chainsaw to the rock song and assembled the hacked up pieces back together with lots of sharp edges sticking out all over the place. They were definitely ahead of their time with irreverent and unapologetic lyrics taking a shit all over patriarchy and scandalizing audiences (the song “Honra” never made it onto their recordings until now). The story in the booklet of sending a talent scout running after hearing one of their songs reminds me of the philosophy of Spain’s VULPESS, active around the same time, who got a TV program shut down in Spain for performing a song called “I Like Being a Slut.” Nice packaging with a semi-bilingual booklet in English and Portuguese containing old flyers, pictures, and lyrics. This is an important piece of Brazilian punk history and crucial international punk artifact with a renewed relevance in 2015. (Lena T)
(Dama da Noite / Nada Nada)