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Black Pills (photo by Ricky Castanedo)

New Blood! ANTIFACES, ABUSIVO, HARM DONE, and BLACK PILLS

“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info ...

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Sorry Not Sorry

MRR Radio #1502 • 4/24/16

Dan is back from punk vacation, and plays what he picked up. Rest In Power, ...

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Techie Blood (photo by Mikey 47)

New Blood! TECHIE BLOOD, MORROW, HOMOSUPERIOR, LUBRICANT, and BIG BITE

“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info ...

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Great Punk Hits

MRR Radio #1501 • 4/17/16

Amelia has local punk Chris on her radio show to discuss Oakland’s fast approaching annual ...

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New Blood! ATROPELLO, DRUGCHARGE, SATAN ZAGUERO, and ÖNKIIRTAS

“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info ...

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Maximum Rocknroll #391 • Dec 2015

Maximum Rocknroll #391 December 2015

It’s time for Maximum Rocknroll #391, the December 2015 issue of punk’s longest continuously running fanzine! This one is loaded. In these pages you will find what may be the most in-depth correspondence with the MINNEAPOLIS URANIUM CLUB BAND you’ll find anywhere—their parent company and attorneys are notoriously cagey, so read here for more on this Midwestern rock group, their origins, and their sponsors. We’ve also got interviews with Finnish hardcore lifers SA-INT, Alabama antagonist GARY WRONG, the minds behind the radical and labyrinthine Texas hardcore of SIN MOTIVO, the jagged noiseniks of Oakland’s MANSION, and outsider San Francisco hardcore punks TSA. There’s even more! For our first ever interview with any Cuban band in these pages we sat down with ADICTOX and ARRABIO during their Canadian tour, and capping it all off is an incredible interview with Zoë Dodd, Toronto harm reduction worker, activist, and punk. Also included: a scene report from Andalusia as well as photo spreads from Not Dead Yet 2015 and All Punks Go For It, a raw punk rager in the heart of California’s Central Valley. All your favorite columnists are here too, along with punk’s most comprehensive and unsparing reviews section.

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Maximum Rocknroll #390 • Nov 2015

mrr_390_cvrIt’s time for Maximum Rocknroll #390, the November 2015 issue! On our cover: AS MERCENÁRIAS, DIY post-punk legends from Brazil whose revelatory 1983 demo was just reissued on Nada Nada Discos. This issue also includes two conversations spanning the punk festival circuit: Not Dead Yet organizer Greg Benedetto sheds light on the motivations behind punk promotion, the ethical challenges of a growing fest, and a perfect day in Toronto; further south, organizers and performers alike pitch in on a brief oral history of Chattanooga’s Do Ya Hear We fest. Even more interviews in these pages, direct from the source: famously prolific MPC-augmented Ohio punks OBNOX; revolutionary Oakland noise voyagers SBSM; the dark and entrancing STRANGLED out of Edmonton; severe and austere Chicago post-punkers POPULATION; the raw noisy hardcore pandrogynous agenda of Portland’s EMASCULATOR; and last but not least, our first-ever interview with PARASITES in their nearly 30-year history spanning New Jersey and the Bay Area. As if that weren’t enough for you, we’ve also packed in photo spreads from the opening weekend of DIY Space for London and, from the dead center of the midwestern freak beat underground, Springfield, IL’s Dumb Fest 3D. All of this, the columns you love to loathe, and the most extensive reviews section in the wide world of punk print.

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Create to Destroy! Stuart Schrader


September 23rd, 2015 by

You may have heard the name Stuart Schrader before, as he did Game of the Arseholes zine. This was a highly respected zine in the “rawer” punk scene which you may have inferred from the title which references ANTI-CIMEX. He has done countless interviews, some of which have appeared in MRR such as MISSBRUKARNA and MELLAKKA. Oh, and don’t forget the ANTI-CIMEX archive! I am hoping for a re-issue of his zine, but for now here is an interview (by Amelia Eakins):
How’d you discover punk?
First, thanks for the interview. I appreciate the Create to Destroy! feature because I think it is really important to recognize the blood, sweat, tears, and labor put into the punk scene that goes beyond just playing in bands. It would be incredible if we rewrote punk history not from the perspective of bands only but from a more holistic perspective of everyone who contributes, including those whose idea of “do it yourself” is to do nothing but just be a punk!

Anyway, I came to punk in a way that is almost unimaginable today: with great difficulty. I knew about punk years before I had ever heard it. I learned of the band names MINOR THREAT, BLACK FLAG, and DEAD KENNEDYS through mentions of them by guy named Glen Plake, who was an extreme skier with a giant mohawk who was semi-famous in the early 1990s. But it was before the internet and because I didn’t know any punks, I didn’t really know how to find the music. I discovered a DEAD KENNEDYS badge in a suburban CD shop, but they didn’t, as far as I could tell, have any of their CDs or cassettes. I was a pretty disaffected, angry, and lonely kid, and I was listening to mainstream metal and grunge at the time. Eventually, I met some punks, including one with whom I’m still friends: Nick Turner, who played guitar in COLD SWEAT and WALLS. He made some mixtapes for me, and it all began. Nowadays, one can use a search engine to discover so much, but it’s hard to imagine YouTube or downloaded mp3s being as precious to anyone today as those first mixtapes made by Nick and other friends were to me.

Yeah it used to be difficult to get into punk, I miss the hunt. Do you like ANTI-CIMEX?
I would say that I am obsessed with about three years of ANTI-CIMEX’s history. On most days, I think their second 7” is the finest hardcore record ever produced: just uncontrolled, sheer rage. I am also quite fond of their third 7”, as well as compilation and other tracks recorded circa 1983 and sung in Swedish. I do like their later output, but my life would not be diminished if I never heard it again. The 1983–1984 stuff, though, is essential.

On the Anti-Cimex Archive, I have collected a lot of information and ephemera about ANTI-CIMEX and SKITSLICKERS. I have tried to make the postings interesting and compendious, but it is difficult to be totally accurate, especially because there are lots of competing stories to be found and because I don’t speak Swedish. There is another cool blog in a similar spirit by a Swedish dude that fans should check called Victims of a Bombraid. Members of ANTI-CIMEX are on Facebook, and more ephemera is appearing online. Still, I am proud that I have put a lot of unique material online for free and easy access, stuff that is nearly impossible to find elsewhere. My favorite posts are one with complete info on the eight SKITSLICKERS sleeve variations and one on a few pre-CIMEX bands. I do have a lot more material that I would like to put online someday. It’s a slow process.

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Create to Destroy! Loud Punk


August 26th, 2015 by

I met Chris when I was with Perdition on a small Montreal/Albany tour in 2010.  I think that’s when I met Chris?  Anyway, he’s always been a go-to person in Albany and I wanted to find out more about his label and his recent Noise Annoys record store turned web shop.  Here is Chris from Loud Punk Records and Noise Annoys:

Are you from Albany?
Yes I’ve spent almost my entire life bouncing around the Albany area minus a small stint in Boston during 2000.

punk

What was the height of the scene there?
It really depends on how you look at. The late 90s was a really great time to grow up around here in the aspect of the punk scene.  It was a really crazy and exciting place during those days. All corners of the scene were really thriving, with shows all the time and a lot less internal divisions and inner scene politics. At the same time it was also a pretty intense and dangerous scene too. You typically couldn’t go to a show without at least a handful of brawls breaking out.But it too really depended on what shows you went to. It taught me a lot of life lessons at a young age, good and bad. The 2005/2006 years were also a really key time locally. The first part of the 2000’s were kind of bleak around here then. There was a resurgence, all of us that had been around for a bit weren’t kids anymore and started filling the shoes of guys like Nate from DEVOID OF FAITH/Gloom Records and others who were the real backbone of what went on around here but were not as active as they once were.  There was also a whole new wave of kids that started coming to shows. We had some amazing venues, great bands not only in the local scene but coming through town at the time. It made for a very fun and exciting environment.

What’s it like now?
Albany’s scene comes in waves, though things will be great for a few years, but quiet for a few. Currently it’s a little quiet but your hard pressed to find a scene not in a major city that isn’t in the same position that we are. While some come and go, the core group of dedicated folks around here are still doing what they know and love. Things can only get better and I have no doubt they will.

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Blast From the Past: Xcentric Noise


August 4th, 2015 by

this ran originally in MRR #339

by Andy “Shesk” Thompson

I’m listening to the Beating the Meat LP from 1984 to get me self in the mood, but it really pisses me off every time I hear it… It was a great compilation, a culmination of the stuff I’d done to date, all the excitement of receiving the tapes, the tape-to-tape duplicating, the stupid sound effects, the letters, the DIY!! When I went into a studio with the quarter-inch tape to put it together (Angel Studios near Hull, with Steve Larkman the engineer — I’m sure he thought I was nuts), I paid about £240. I designed the cover and wanted to do the usual inner sleeve — since packaging was always well important and far more interesting and exciting than a two-track single in a plain sleeve — but I had no money and accepted an offer to release it…and was ripped off, struggled to get any copies, the cover was just turned orange and had no inner sleeve, it never looked or felt right — and yet sounded amazing! There was no communication and it took ages for me to get back my costs for the studio, which only happened because I knew the guy at the distributor Jungle Records and he felt guilty, ’cos he knew I was on a loser. I managed to get a few copies off him, too, but not many. I dunno how many were actually made or sold.

And for the record, I made nothing from Beating the Meat and was forever pissed off that all those years had been hijacked!! Just one of my many regrets, but at least it got the bands heard again around the world! Please have it for free (download via mediafire.com) ’cos I’m not re-releasing it, not that I ever got the master tape back anyhow. I’ll be happy you just at least hear all the bands on it, ’cos that’s all Xcentric Noise was about — trying to pass on some of the excitement I was feeling, spreading this amazing music with message and passion and screaming anger and everyone doing it yerself! It was just so energising….

DISCOVERING PUNK

shesk_oldI first got into punk about May ’77, the moment I first heard it. I was only fourteen years old, previously had liked T. Rex and Sparks and some Bowie. I remember going into school the day after seeing a newspaper with the Sex Pistols in it, and talking music with my mate Mu. He said, “You’d love punk — listen to John Peel.” Bang, it was instant — a real slap in the face. My tranny radio and the pillow were my friends for a few years after that, and definitely the best part of the day! I guess maybe I’d finally found somewhere I felt I could belong, somewhere outside the norm.

I grew up in Little Weighton, England — a village with no streetlights, pretty cut off from the world. I guess I didn’t fit in with the norm, a kinda loner but with friends, the weird one, and the only one really into punk down our way. But ’cos I played football pretty good, I didn’t get fucked around, just the piss-takes like normal. They never got punk rock! I just ended up doing stuff all the time in me room while always liking and supporting the underdog (Hull City / Norman Wisdom [RIP] / Newport County); I was anti-injustice, anti-apartheid and anti-poverty, and I hated pop music, disco and shit soft rock crap.

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