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Create to Destroy! Loud Punk

I met Chris when I was with Perdition on a small Montreal/Albany tour in 2010.  ...

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Record of the Week: C.C.T.V

Record of the Week: C.C.T.V

C.C.T.V – “Quiet” EP The coolest record of the year so far at least to these ...

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2 METRIC TONS OF STEEL, 100 KILOMETERS AN HOUR: Permanent Ruin on Tour in Europe

San Jose's Permanent Ruin recently went on tour in Europe. Drummer Rich Gutierez wrote an ...

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Venganza!

New Blood! SONIC ORDER, VENGANZA! and EXHAUST

“New Blood” is our weekly feature spotlighting new bands from around the world! See below for info ...

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Spokane, WA

MRR Radio #1467 • 8/23/15

Big ups to SK & Kip and 1990s Spokanarchy on this episode of the Rotten ...

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Blast From the Past: The Petticoats


August 20th, 2015 by

This originally ran in MRR #312/May ’09. which you can grab here
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Stef Petticoat is best known for her pioneering, one-woman punk band, the Petticoats. As a German lesbian, Stef also stands out with her entirely unique approach to the blossoming late 1970s European punk scene. Her self-recorded, self-released Petticoats single was “Record of the Week” on the BBC’s John Peel show in 1980. As the ’80s progressed, Stef also formed the groups Necessary Evil, Amy and the Angels, 69 Lies, and collaborated with Robert Crash. Her trailblazing methods have proved successful in even more fruitful ways—with almost three decades of music, Stef Petticoat’s story is one that illustrates the diverse history of punk.
Interview by Jess Scott
MRR: Let’s start from the beginning: how did you originally get into playing music? What kind of music were you first attracted to?

Stef: According to my baby book I was singing constantly before the age of two. I have no recollection of this. I always liked music. When I started school I learned to play the C Alto and Tenor recorder with the Youth Music School—classical music. When I was about 13, Beat music started. I really liked the Beatles and Rolling Stones, and desperately wanted to learn to play guitar. But my parents said no and I had no money. After I had pestered them for a year they finally gave in and I was given an acoustic guitar for Christmas and had lessons. Unfortunately, the teacher and my parents insisted I learn classical guitar, as this would be the basis for pop music. Later a friend showed me a few chords and I have not really progressed from that! After Beat, of course I was a hippie and loved the Grateful Dead, Frank Zappa, Jefferson Airplane, etc. And I really liked the Velvet Underground! I grew up in the bourgeois ’50s (I am now 59!) and already as a hippie I felt “out of the system.” But it was punk that really made me think, “This is the best music ever and this is what I want to do!”

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MRR: How did you make the jump to being in punk bands then?

Stef: This is all so long ago! I hope I remember it all. After I got infected with punk (in 1976 I think, when I traveled to London and New York City), a friend (male) who was a singer in a band suggested I try it out. I started singing Patti Smith songs with a friend who played the piano. I had bought the Patti Smith songbook in New York and loved it. Then I tried to find a band who wanted a singer, but this turned out to be very difficult. I worked in Aachen at the time and spent my weekends in Bonn (where I used to live).

I auditioned for bands in the Aachen, Bonn, and Cologne area, but they were all boring male rock bands who had never heard of punk. They thought I was too wild and my musical ideas too crazy. So I thought, well, if I really want to make the music I like then I have to go to London or New York! I packed my bags and went to London. The bands I auditioned there were just as boring—what a disappointment! Finally, one day at the women’s arts alliance, one woman told me about someone she knew who might be into the same music as I—and she was! It was Zuni (who is now a student of ecology in New Zealand). She and I hit it off right away. She played the drums and I bought an electric guitar and sang. We found a bass player, (who left shortly after to continue her university studies, so we found another), and an additional guitarist. We called the band Necessary Evil. We wrote songs and played a few gigs, but the other guitarist was a very strong lesbian feminist separatist. I refused to sing her songs, which were only about killing all men. She decided she did not want to play shows for men anymore—but I did! We had a lot of arguments. The other band mates took her side and decided to dissolve the band. This was a great shock to me. After a while I became friends again with Zuni, and the bass player, Trish, who now is a gardener.

 Myspace6-300dpi2 Read the rest of this entry »



Create to Destroy: Beau Patrick Coulon


August 19th, 2015 by

I met Beau Patrick Coulon in passing in many places over the years. He gets around the USA punk scene and documents it well by camera.  I feel like I run into him everywhere.  Since I keep seeing his photos published (even in MRR!) I thought I would interview him as to break a bit of the mystery of the man behind the lens:

Where are you from?
For better or worse I’ll always be from LA.

New Orleans 2015

New Orleans 2015

Why do you think it’s important that your roots are in the LA punk scene?
It shaped me as an individual early on. I was introduced to squatting and living outside the norms of regular society in the Hollywood punk scene. I don’t know what it was like in other cities but in my neighborhood during the late 80s/early 90s it was junkies, thieves, hookers, gangs, and the daily hustle of survival. 18th St was shooting it out with White Fence in the Yucca Corridor every single day. Gunshots on the hour almost. You had Hollywood Dogs, The Trolls, LA Death Squad, all kinds of skinheads, and oh yeah, Crips & Bloods. Everyone brought their beef to the Blvd. It was a tense time and being punk made you a target. It wasn’t something people got into lightly. There were automatic, often violent, repercussions.

BLAZING EYE @ Berserktown fest, LA 2014

BLAZING EYE @ Berserktown fest, LA 2014

What was your first punk show?
I’m not 100% sure. I remember seeing FEAR at the Hollywood Palladium when I was 14. Me and a bunch of other broke punks rushed the gates. About half of us got in. To be honest I remember the fights I saw at that show more than I remember the bands. In those days I was more into listening to tapes on my crackbox while getting wasted in the alley than watching shows. We had Green Hell Records up off the boulevard and that place ruled, I got some of my first punk tapes there.
What was the punk scene like coming up?
The “scene” I came up in, if you can call it that, was hostile. Most the punks I hung out with were pretty fucked up. If you had dreams or ideas beyond the next 40 oz you were chastised for “thinking you were better than everyone else.” Kids were quick to physical violence. You had to develop really thick skin or you wouldn’t make it. It was some toxic ass Darwinism type shit. Mostly we just panhandled, stole shit, turned tricks, whatever it took to get enough money so we could get trashed. There was some solidarity however. If you saw someone who appeared even remotely punk back then, it wasn’t even a question, you had to talk to them. Half out of curiosity, half out of the need for safety in numbers. A lot of people idealize this time period. I do not. There were fun moments for sure, but compared to my life today it was pretty awful.


Are you still connected to the LA scene?

Loosely. It’s different for me now. Most the punks I used to kick it with are either dead, locked up, or moved away. Headline Records on Melrose is probably the last punk hold out in Hollywood. But there’s always cool shit happening in LA. It’s one of the most creative places on the planet. Every time I’m there it seems like there’s some good backyard show, some new collective starting, or interesting project happening. As you know, the East 7th Street Punx do rad stuff. There’s Bridgetown DIY in La Peunte and VLHS in Pomona, both are all ages punk/DIY venues. Musica Para La Destrukcion in South Central makes killer shirts, pins, and tapes. And there are shitloads of excellent punk bands from all around the LA area: BLAZING EYE, GRIMA, DRAPETOMANIA, SADICOS, TOZCOS, AUSENCIA, RAYOS X, to list a few.

Where are you now?
New Orleans

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Reissue of the Week: 92 – “Cenzura/Cukrarnar”


August 19th, 2015 by

92 – “Cenzura/Cukrarnar”
The travel back in time continues! Next stop: Ljubljana, Slovenia circa 1978. Like many bands from former Yugoslavia, 92—who get their name from the police’s phone number, the equivalent to 911 in the US—fuse new wave sounds with reconstructed regional and traditional musical elements, all filtered through punk with a keyboard twist. 92 were informed by, but not dependent on or limited to, bands such as the CLASH, SEX PISTOLS and STONES, and concepts such as nihilism, Dadaism and social critique. Their logo of the number 92 inside a triangle charms and perplexes me despite its simplicity. This results in upbeat tracks with layers of choppy and grazing guitars, dancey drums alongside swelling bass, and soulful, raw organ riffs haunting the whole thing. The lyrics are critical and sharp. “Cukrarnar” (“Sugar Works Man”) tells the story of a “raged vagrant on the street […], he’s dirty and full of trash, in sugar works every night he spends, but then he wakes up on the bench.” “Cenzura,” which discusses the issue of state censorship, is slightly darker, with its dense opening riff and staccato keyboards. “Basically you corrected everything on your own.” The keys are wonderfully expressive, tying this whole concept together in a unique manner; at times sounding almost like a child’s melodica, at others more like a breezy church organ, or carrying the frenetic beat in an almost accordion-at-the-fair fashion. Their collected works LP, which was released in 2013 also by NE! Records and reviewed in these pages, is definitely worth checking out if you have an interest in early European punk, but this 45 works as an excellent introduction to this extraordinary band. Two tracks that are equal parts vibrant demonstration as they are creative exuberance. As always, comes in a beautiful packaging, with lots of pictures and translated lyrics. Check out their interview in MRR #378 and hvala NE! Records for doing such a great job! (Lydiya)
(NE!)



Record of the Week: Andy Human and the Reptoids


August 18th, 2015 by

ANDY HUMAN AND THE REPTOIDS — LP
“Reptoid Rock Revenge” is the motto on the collage/lyric sheet. How and by whom were they slighted? The answers may be in Fortean Times rather than these pages. I, however, can tell you that so much of what makes this record great could have gone terribly in lesser hands: saxophones, synthesizers, rhyming “insides” with “intestines”. It all comes together in the hands of ANDY HUMAN, rocker and composer. Some tracks toe the line of Boogaloo palatability, but there’s an attention to detail and careful application of sheer noise all over here, the watermark of a dedicated stylist. The production here is polished enough to let the static and atonal saxophone-wailing stand out. High fidelity recording works to a band’s favor for once. Then again I seriously think the internet-using public would flip out if this was recorded on a Tascam 414 and if everyone in the band was 5-10 years younger. Perhaps the world will appreciate this record after all, though we know too well how cruel America’s tastes and ultimate fate can be. But seek out “I Got Soul” if you need a sample; rarely since Rock’n’Roll Animal have punk desperation and glam virtuosity come together in such a frothy eruption. I’d buy seven copies of this record if I could afford it, but I can’t. Anyway, this record is one of the two most assertive statements on having no money in the city to come in this month. Some react to late capitalism in urban America by withdrawing; some stick around to try their hand at outplaying, outsmarting, and outlasting the suddenly very late night. Hand them the keys to the studio. (Eli Wald)
(S-S)



MRR Radio #1466 • 8/16/15


August 16th, 2015 by

Cincinnati, OH’s VACATION stop by the MRR compound in the middle of their US tour.

Play

Intro song:
SEXY – Smoking Popes

VACATION, all I ever wanted.

“All I ever wanted.”

Dylan Plays Drums
THE MOB – Witch Hunt
EGO SUMMIT – Beyond the Laws
JOY DIVISION – Digital (Live)
THE FALL – Totally Wired

Jerri Sings
YOGURT – Gravity
PSYCHEDELIC HORSESHIT – Ring on the Curse
TINA, AGE 13 – Sunday Morning
ST. DAD – Kill Me – Kill You – Luv You
THE SLOBS – Kill Kill Cool

Evan Is the Wolfman
GENERATION X – Ready Steady Go
EDDIE & THE HOT RODS – Quit This Town
THE FEELERS – Nothing Always
THOMAS JEFFERSON SLAVE APARTMENTS – Bread and Butter

John Shreds
THE EMBARRASSMENT – I’m a Don Juan
DISHPIT – Dishpit Anthem
DISHPIT – Super America
LAZY – Fire Escape
50 MILLION – Sleepover
THE TWINKEYZ – ESP

Punk Runs in the Family
RUTH ANN JONESTOWN AND THE SICK RATS – You’re a Sick Rat

Outro song:
VACATION – Decaying

Maximum Rocknroll Radio is a weekly radio show and podcast featuring DIY punk, garage rock, hardcore, and more from around the world. Our rotating cast of DJs picks the best of the best from MRR magazine’s astounding, ever-growing vinyl archive. You can find MRR Radio archives, specials, and more at radio.maximumrocknroll.com. Thanks for listening!