Featured Posts

New Blood! ALLERGY, DESPERFECTO, and MODERN LOVE

MRR magazine's "New Blood" section is now a regular feature here on MRR.com! See below ...

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Video of the Week! Distorted: Reflections on Early Sydney Punk

This month's Maximum Rocknroll magazine features an interview with Des Devlin, the filmmaker behind the documentary Distorted: ...

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Record of the Week: CADAVER EM TRANSE LP

Based in São Paulo and featuring members of RAKTA and SPEED KILLS, this is a ...

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Guest Column: Sean Hocking on Genjing Records

Genjing Records: Connecting China's Underground with the World, One 7" at a Time Let's head off ...

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Absurdo at Txoritokieta, August 2014 (photo by Fidel Gutierrez)

Monday Photo Blog: Fidel Gutierrez

Here's some pretty cool photos for the Monday Photo Blog sent over the Atlantic by Fidel Gutierrez. These ...

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MRR Radio #1431 • 12/14/14


December 14th, 2014 by

This week Matt hates the cops, loves the Deutschpunk, and shares some recent acquisitions from his travels, as well as spinning a few newer releases.

Play

Intro song:
VERTIGO – Vertigo

Grazhdanskaya Oborona

Grazhdanskaya Oborona

For the Badge-Wearin’ Fascist Villans
SLIME – ACAB
BGK – Police Crimes
MUSHROOM ATTACK – Kill the Pigs
THE KIDS – Fascist Cops
REALLY RED – Teaching You the Fear

Newer Faves
LAS CRUCES – Supersida/Matarte
LEVITATIONS – Partners in Crime
PURA MANIA – Sospechoso
VIVID SEKT – The Void

Deutschpunk Rules
MARIONETZ – Gas Gas Gas
KGB – Sekt Ist Kaltgestellt
ABWÄRTS – Monday On My Mind
EA80 – In Allen Dingen
UNWANTED YOUTH – Brain Attack
AUSBRUCH – Südafrika

From the Bins of Europe
ZARAMA – Zaramaren Erdian
KUD IDIJOTI – Preživjeti
GRAZHDANSKAYA OBORONA – Мы В Глубокой Жопе
VONBRIGDI – Ó, Reykjavík

Outro songs:
SELFISH – Overcome
CARTOUCHE – Obscenity

Maximum Rocknroll Radio is a weekly radio show and podcast featuring DIY punk, garage rock, hardcore, and more from around the world. Our rotating cast of DJs picks the best of the best from MRR magazine’s astounding, ever-growing vinyl archive. You can find MRR Radio archives, specials, and more at radio.maximumrocknroll.com. Thanks for listening!



MRR Presents: Friday Fuckin’ Funnies! #64


December 12th, 2014 by

LIFE IS POSERS!

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Loads more at lifeisposers.com

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NOWHERE CITY by Vickie Smalls!

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More great comix by Vic at nowherecitycomix.tumblr.com

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Every Friday we have a selection of comic strips from punx like you… You make funnies? Send em to funnies {at} maximumrocknroll(.)com and maybe you’ll see yer comic here next Friday!



Read a Book! Valerie Solanas: The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote SCUM (and Shot Andy Warhol)


December 11th, 2014 by

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Valerie Solanas: The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote SCUM (and Shot Andy Warhol)
Breanne Fahs
The Feminist Press

Review by E. Connor in MRR #380

Valerie Solanas is a strange cultural icon. She is perhaps most often used as a derogatory warning for young women: “the wrong kind of feminist.” In an age of combating #womenagainstfeminism with cupcakey bullshit and Kathleen Hanna documentaries, this lack of historical accuracy and nuance is detrimental. We require Valerie to be represented as what she truly was: a fiercely intellectual militant feminist who aleced poor and alone because this world kills people like that.

Personally, Valerie is of interest to me in charting these people, the controversial, difficult women that are forgotten and discarded. Even among them Valerie is not alone is her abandonment. The great failures are Valerie Solanas, Lee Lozano and Shulamith Firestone. All attempted to straddle art and politics, all chose madness and obscurity in lieu of becoming washed out in the limelight. Nuts to the Steinems!

In April I visited New York City and was lucky enough to attend a release event at NYU for this book. An intimidating panel included Avital Ronell, Lisa Duggan, Karen Finley and the author, Breanne Fahs. As the panel went on I slowly realized what was happening. I was in a room full of (mostly) beautiful, smart women repeating the word “shit” over and over. I like to think this was the utopia Valerie imagined so long ago.

I understand that in even articulating that idea I’m doing exactly what everyone has ever done to Valerie’s work. I project my own desires into the intricate complications of her life, art and work. We exist in this place where refining women (and other complicated people) into flattened figures is the norm. Is it even possible to tell a story of history in a way that isn’t problematic? It’s so riddled with the afflictions of opinion and memory failure.

Fahs is a delicate biographer. She fills in nuance without betraying the subject. She’s compassionate and holistic. What is produced feels dense. While it’s not a totally critical history it is one that demands an active participant. The story of Valerie’s years in New York’s Lower East Side, culminating in her infamous act, are bookended by the brutal years that created and destroyed the human being. It’s perhaps not fair to conceptualize a human life as a flickering light with a crescendo.

When one regards the tragedy of Solanas’s life it’s too easy to conjure pity and rely on that as some accurate representation of her total legacy. The truth is Valerie saved us. She undeniably produced a cultural crack-up. The burgeoning feminist consciousness raising movement would have been nothing without her. While so much organization was vulcanized at the time of her arrest, theory too owes her a great debt. Shulamith Firestone’s conceptualized “Smile Strike,” from the far more validated The Dialectic of Sex was preceded by Solanas’ call for the death of niceness. Modern theoretical feminism and queer theory still look towards SCUM for guidance. Kathi Weeks’ “non-work” recalls Valerie’s “un-working.” Sara Ahmed’s “feminist killjoy” and Lauren Berlant and Lee Edelman’s beckoning towards an academically sanctioned queer nihilism all have foundations in SCUM.

There has been a tendency to regard Valerie as an accident. She is often removed or distanced from revisionist feminist history. While it’s true that she never did fit in with the publicized movement, she does not deserve to be forgotten. Valerie was as much of a disruption to the slide into co-opting radical feminism towards liberal reformism, or as it’s been suggested, just a disruption in general. Her personal effect on the lives of some of the most cherished minds of this movement is not to be undermined. The correspondence with and testimony of Ti-Grace Atkinson, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Florence Kennedy, Shulamith Firestone and Robin Morgan are all included, finally cementing Solanas in her place among them.

A legacy like this deserves a considerate articulation. Fahs took ten years to write the book Valerie swore she’d write herself. This kind of care for Solanas’ life is uncommonly kind when you consider the treatment Valerie’s work received the second anyone else got their hands on it. All of it has been stolen, lost, edited, misspelled, withheld, hidden, and destroyed.

Even now, the bulk of Valerie’s surviving work (SCUM Manifesto) is printed and distributed largely by the anarchist-publishing house AK Press. Every few years another edition comes out with another forward written by a different person. The most recent edition touts notorious Marilyn Manson fan Michelle Tea’s take on the manifesto. Ms. Tea, once a young radical dyke poet, is now the editor of a popular hipster motherhood blog. While the lesbian mother could be one interpretation of Valerie’s demand for “complete automation” it still feels something like failure. And where does the money go?

Valerie Solanas is an attempt to map the great sources of the paranoia that were Valerie’s downfall. Like any young woman, her sexuality and psychic body were mangled early on. Part of the map of Valerie’s life is strongly situated in the way she defined and declared her vision. Fahs uses Valerie’s own words whenever possible. It’s rather exciting for any Solanas fans out there to get to eek whatever they can out of the quotes from Up Your Ass, various interviews, college newspaper articles, and correspondence that Fahs had access to.

These kinds of considerations are partly due to Fahs’ background in Feminist Studies and Psychology, a very important distinction in the overall tone of the book. Fahs is careful to include the reputation and conditions of not only the institutions that Valerie landed in after shooting Andy Warhol, but critically traces her movements through schools, the hospitals where she gave birth to at least two children, residential hotels, jail cells, collective meetings, diners and beds. You see this complicated figure moving about truly alive and conscious, wading through the same shit as all of us.

I finished the book on the train headed to work. I got off two stops early and rode my bike to the place Valerie died. Alone in a hotel room (and never wanted once) for at least five days. The front of the Bristol Hotel is collaged with handwritten notes regarding hotel policies and notes to UPS drivers. A historical site plaque bulges from the wall. It neglects to mention the two most famous residents, Valerie and Richard Ramirez, aka the “Night Stalker,” notorious serial killer/rapist and Satanist.



New Blood! SPECULUM, STEVE CREATURE and NO CROSS


December 11th, 2014 by

Formerly a section of MRR magazine, New Blood is now a weekly web feature to spotlight new, up-and-coming bands. See below for info on how to submit your band. Now, get to discovering some killer new shit…

Band name:
SPECULUM

Date & location formed:
Feb. 2014 in Miami, FL (Little Haiti).

Reason for forming:
We wanted to start a hardcore punk band.

What are your lyrics about?
Punk love, heart break, betrayal, bad kids, urban decay, snapping under the pressure of society, drunk skanking, vengeance, death.

Speculum live copy

How would you describe your sound?
Little Haiti Hardcore, snotty punk, silly string and studs.

What’s in the future for this band?
Record full-length.

Links and contact info:
speculum9.bandcamp.com
Facebook page

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Steve Creature

Band name:
STEVE CREATURE

Date & location formed:
Started this tape project sometime in 2012 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Reason for forming:
Boredom. I bought a pack of 100 cassette tapes that could only record 2.5 minutes per side. I started recording little pop songs on these tapes and hiding them around my town. I thought it would be neat to offer custom cassettes where people can pick any two of my songs and I’ll record a tape and mail it out. A bit more personal than a 7” because no two tapes are alike…But they are tapes, so most people hate me from the start.

What are your lyrics about?
Mostly self loathing.

How would you describe your sound?
Tape fuzz, acoustic guitar with sometimes a drum machine. My dog barks a lot when I record.

What’s in the future for this band?
First 100 tapes were on solid yellow, I’m almost out of my 2nd 100 on clearish yellow. I guess I’ll keep doing this until the tape company goes bankrupt.

Links and contact info:
Feel free to order a tape at stevecreature.blogspot.com or just walk around Lancaster, PA, and you might find one.
Photo is of my one tape I did for fussy fucker tapes, drawn by Liz Prince.

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No Cross

Band name:
NO CROSS

Date & location formed:
February 2014, Sunderland, UK.

Reason for forming:
Lack of music scene where we live despite its punk heritage and a urge to play. Bedroom demos were put together by myself (Jamie) and guitarist Jacka, we then recruited two friends; Dean who also plays in Sunderland legends HDQ & Josh from drone merchants Neolithic.

What are your lyrics about?
The duality of man, the complacency of the modern age, paranoia, fear, stress, matricide, genocide, pollution & the mundanity of my life and yours.

No Cross live

How would you describe your sound?
American ’80s and UK ’90s hardcore punk. This qoute has been applied: “Sounds like SS Decontrol hitting hard against Rudimentary Peni” – Steve Stewart, Jaded Eyes.

What’s in the future for this band?
New demo tape/CD very soon, more gigs and new material.

Links and contact info:
facebook.com/nocrossband
nocross.bandcamp.com

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Do you have or know of an awesome new band? It’s easy to submit to be in MRR’s New Blood feature. Just send us the following info, and keep keeping’ it real…

1) Band name:
2) Date & location formed:
3) Reason for forming:
4) What are your lyrics about?
5) How would you describe your sound?
6) What’s in the future for this band?

Along with the answers, please send a band photo at least 600px on the longest side (with photo credits), a logo if you have one, and links and contact info for the band to: mrrnewblood {at} gmail(.)com



Create to Destroy! Blindead Productions


December 10th, 2014 by

CreateToDestroyLogo

Blindead Productions in Sweden has been a serious supporter of punk, and continues to distro the best releases throughout Europe. You may know Krogh from SEX DWARF tours, Distortion Faith zine, his label, or maybe you had a beer with him at the last Varning from Montreal fest. Here is Krogh of Blindead Productions…

What is Blindead Productions? Is it just you who does it?
Yeah, it’s just me. There was a period somewhere around 2002 when we tried to be two people, but it didn’t really work out. Not because we had any problems, it just didn’t last too long. So, with the exception of one year, it’s been me running the show since 1997.

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Blindead Productions is a label dedicated to the music I love — hardcore punk. Vinyl mostly, and some messing around with tapes lately, but the main focus is vinyl. Would be fun to do some sort of book sometime though.

What does “Blindead” mean?
Well, the initial meaning or idea behind it was that we’re already dead, we just don’t know it as the system won’t let us see it. You know, keep us in line, feed the machine, etc., etc. Then it hit me that MISERY has their song “Blindead,” which is an excellent song, and so I rather lie and say it’s an homage to that song. The idea I guess is the same, as the theme of that song isn’t too far off from the idea I had behind the name.

Tell us about Distortion Faith.
This is the zine I do together with Jocke from D-takt & Råpunk. Björn from SMRT Records was also involved in the first five issues but had to leave because of other commitments and lack of time. So far we’ve done six issues and the plan was to have a seventh out in January. That won’t happen because none of us have had the time, but the zine will return sometime this spring, I will make sure of that.

I love doing this zine as I’ve allowed myself not to care too much. Of course I want it to be good, but while in earlier zines I have set up “rules,” I now don’t care if an interview is three questions long or 30, as long as it has at least some content. I promised myself not to do any reviews, but I’ve ended up doing a few anyway and have a few more lined up, but it will not be a recurring thing — done that to death earlier and I pretty much hate it at this point.

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What was ALP tapes? How many different names have you had? Were you a distro or a label first?
ALP Tapes was the very first thing, back in 1997. It started out as something that was supposed to be the label for my band’s demo. The band never recorded anything and I soon realized I’d rather be a label than a musician, so the name stuck for a while and I released ten tapes (nine home copies and one pro printed). Towards the end of ALP Tapes I also had the record label Resist the System, where I released the first CROSSING CHAOS 7” in 2000.

It was when I merged the two that Blindead Productions was born, in 2002. It started out as a label, but very soon became a distro as well — trading tapes and then later on vinyls and some CDs.

Where do you get your records pressed and tapes made? Who do you recommend in Europe?
The Distortion Faith tape was done in England somewhere, Jocke had the contact and I can’t remember. I took care of printing the covers. As for vinyl, I’ve mostly used GZ, but for the WARCOLLAPSE 12” I went with Flight 13 and I will go with them again for the upcoming KRONOFOGDEN LP. I also tried out Mobineko for the HUMAN POWER 7” but I wasn’t very happy with them. Cheap, but not too good. That’s the only place I wouldn’t recommend, other than that I’ve been happy with both GZ and Flight 13.

Where are you in Sweden and what is the scene like? Any bands we should keep an eye on?
I live in Arvika, a small town where absolutely nothing happens. It’s very close to the Norwegian border and I guess Oslo is the closest big town, but I’d rather go to Stockholm to hang out and watch bands.

What was your most popular release?
Hmm, I don’t know. The Distortion Faith comp tape sold out extremely fast, but we only did 250 copies of that one. I guess the KRONOFOGDEN 7” went over really well, at least here in Sweden, but also abroad. I guess some others have been pressed in more copies, but also with more labels, so…

Blindead_kronofogden 7

What are your current projects?
I’ve been putting together the cover for the KRONOFOGDEN LP and making sure Lenny’s drawings fit the sleeve template, and the next step is to finish the insert. Got the mastered tracks just the other day and it’s gonna be a fucking great record! Other than that, I’m still trading and selling the latest release, the INFEKZIOA 7″, to as many places as possible.

Why are zines, tapes, labels, and distros important to punk?
Because they’re easy to do? I mean, you can spend a lot of money printing a zine, but you can also find a cheap printer or copy it yourself. If you have the will to do a zine you can. The same goes for tapes — you can pretty much do everything in your own living room, or go more “professional.” It’s up to you. Labels are less important, I guess, as bands can take care of this themselves, but I’m glad people still want me to put out their records. Distros are important to help keep prices at a decent level and a place where lesser-known bands can get their stuff distributed as well. Keeping prices low is getting harder and harder though.

How did you get into punk and what makes you stay?
I guess I got into the softer style of punk through more mainstream channels and early bands for me were DIA PSALMA, ASTA KASK and EBBA GRÖN. With MOB 47, NO SECURITY and SKITSYSTEM I knew I was hooked for life. EBBA GRÖN, MOB 47 and NO SECURITY are still today, 17–18 years later, three of the best bands I know. What really made me stay is that all of a sudden I was involved in the music I loved, not just a fan — that was really powerful for me.

How can we stay up to date on your releases and projects?
The best way is to check out the website at www.blindeadproductions.com, where I keep info up to date. If you want to go through social medias or newsletters or whatever, you’ll find the info on that there as well. There’s also blindeadproductions.bandcamp.com, where you can check out at least ten full releases, and soon we’ll add the full INFEKZIOA 7″ there, plus a few from the upcoming KRONOFOGDEN LP.